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trochaic

Examples

  • Definition of word from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary with audio pronunciations, thesaurus, Word of the Day, and word games. trochaic noun. Origin of TROCHAIC. Middle French trochaïque, from Latin trochaicus, from Greek trochaikos, from trochaios trochee. First Known Use: 1589. — “Trochaic - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster”, merriam-
  • 2. The trochaic foot.'u This is the exact opposite of the iambic foot; it consists of a A trochaic foot is illustrated by such words as weary, willow, twi kle, flowing, silent. — “Form & Meter”,
  • These are examples of trochaic tetrameter. The most common form Robert Herrick's "The Fairies" is in catalectic trochaic tetrameter, though hardly a single line is exactly. — “I1”, uncg.edu
  • TROCHAIC (/ x): Tell me not in mournful numbers. SPONDAIC (/ /): Break, A good example of trochaic monometer, for example, is this poem entitled "Fleas". — “Rhythm and Meter in English Poetry”, writing.upenn.edu
  • Definition of trochaic in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of trochaic. Pronunciation of trochaic. Translations of trochaic. trochaic synonyms, trochaic antonyms. Information about trochaic in the free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. — “trochaic - definition of trochaic by the Free Online”,
  • Robert Burns & Trochaic Tetrameter (Sort of ) January 3, 2009 upinvermont Leave a comment Go to comments. I recently wrote a post ***yzing a more successful poem written in Trochaic Tetrameter – Edna St Vincent Millay's Sorrow. As it turns out, Burns has tried his hand at a trochaic poem. — “Robert Burns & Trochaic Tetrameter (Sort of...) " PoemShape”,
  • Encyclopedia article about trochaic. Information about trochaic in the Columbia Encyclopedia, Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, computing dictionary. — “trochaic definition of trochaic in the Free Online Encyclopedia”, encyclopedia2
  • LibraryThing catalogs yours books online, easily, quickly and for free. Members with trochaic's books. This information is loading. Loading may take as much as a minute if. — “trochaic | LibraryThing”,
  • Trochaic definition, pertaining to the trochee. See more. — “Trochaic | Define Trochaic at ”,
  • 2. Trochaic (the noun is "trochee"): a stressed followed by an unstressed syllable, as in the word "London" or the line from the nursery rhyme, 8. Octameter (eight feet): Browning's "A Toccata of Galuppi's" is the most famous example of the rare trochaic octameter. — “Elements of Poetry”,
  • Vijver (1998), it is claimed that the Iambic/Trochaic Law (henceforth ITL) iambic and trochaic systems can be accounted for without reference to the ITL. — “The Iambic/Trochaic Law revisited”,
  • How to Identify a Poetic Meter. Why does a Shakespearean actor stress one part of a line over another? English poetry has set patterns of meter hidden within the words themselves when they are put in a sentence or line of Spondaic, anapestic and trochaic each have three syllables. — “How to Identify a Poetic Meter | ”,
  • Definition of trochaic in the Dictionary. Meaning of trochaic. What does trochaic mean? Proper usage of the word trochaic. Information about trochaic in the dictionary, synonyms and antonyms. — “What does trochaic mean? definition and meaning (Free English”,
  • Definition of trochaic from Webster's New World College Dictionary. Meaning of trochaic. Pronunciation of trochaic. Definition of the word trochaic. Origin of the word trochaic. — “trochaic - Definition of trochaic at ”,
  • trochee (poetry), metrical foot consisting of one long syllable (as in classical verse) or stressed syllable (as in English verse) followed by one short or unstressed syllable, as in the word hap'| ̆py. Trochaic metres were extensively used in. — “trochee (poetry) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia”,
  • trochaic (not comparable) Referring to poetry composed of trochees, feet of one stressed syllable followed by unstressed syllable. Retrieved from "http:///wiki/trochaic". — “trochaic - Wiktionary”,
  • Lines of verse made up predominantly of trochees are referred to as trochaic verse or trochaics. Trochaic verse is also well-known in Latin poetry, especially of the medieval period. — “trochee: Definition from ”,
  • The usual form, in which the Greeks employed the measure, was the trochaic tetrameter catalectic, the scheme of which is as follows: - The trochaic metre is rapid in movement and breathless, and is generally used to depict strong emotions or to tell an exciting narrative. — “Trochaic - LoveToKnow 1911”, 1911
  • These lines are primarily trochaic, with the last syllable dropped so that the line ends with a stressed syllable to give a strong rhyme or masculine rhyme. Trochaic verse is also well-known in Latin poetry, especially of the. — “Trochee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • Top questions and answers about Trochaic. Find 16 questions and answers about Trochaic at Read more. — “Trochaic - ”,
  • This is the reverse of the lines we have been looking at-- / x, instead of x /. But this is jump rope rhyme, which is always in trochaic meter, in this case, trochaic dimeter. Early in the 20th century Vachel Lindsay made a great reputation. — “PoeticMeter”,
  • Trochaic octameter is a poetic meter that has eight trochaic metrical feet per line. The best known work in trochaic octameter is Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven," which utilizes five lines of trochaic octameter followed by a "short". — “Trochaic octameter - Reference”,

Videos

  • Stephen Fry Poetry Challenge : Round Four The fourth in a series of my grappling with Stephen Fry's poetry exercises in this book: Hurl all the abuse you like! Post your own attempts at the exercise in the comments. Go NUTS. Check out more of my atrocities at
  • FROG GALLIARD-John Dowland The Frog Galliard by John Dowland..Of the six or so versions this is the one Dowland put his name to and differs from other versions by the "varied repeat of the first strain with virtouso triplets over a trochaic bass line drawn from the first strain"....hmmmmmm, don't think I did that.......maybe I need a lute....
  • English Words: lapins, acting, tethers, attending, tempera, corpulency, untried Music By Aalborg Soundtracks, from Audioswap -- see from the album Aalborg Soundtracks Vol. 5, on iTunes definitions of the words: lapins, acting, tethers, attending, tempera, corpulency, untried, squalls, reach, neatly, procurement, novice, exegetic, oncology, disco, chrysanthemum, chillies, investing, cypress, repetitiveness, keeper, farming, trochaics
  • Pérotin: Viderunt omnes [with score - original m***cript] Pérotin's Viderunt Omnes (1198), performed by the Hilliard Ensemble. The foundation of Viderunt omnes is a plainchant that likely served the Parisian liturgy for Christmas Day. The text comes from verses of Psalm 98 in the Vulgate's Latin (Ps. 98:3b-4a, 2), jubilantly singing of the moment when God's salvation is made known to all the Earth. (Incidentally, the text naturally seems to call for such a concord of many voices!) Following the responsory form of plainchant, Viderunt omnes consists of a solo incipit, a chanted conclusion, a short verset (also perhaps for solo), and a repeat of the opening section. Pérotin's setting preserves the form and retains the liturgically correct chant melody, but embellishes it by two "discant clausulae," sections of composed polyphony that substitute for the solo chants. For each clausula, the choir sings the notes of the chant melody, but each note is greatly extended. Above this abstracted chant is woven a web of three solo voices dancing about one another in long, metrical melismas on the chant syllables. The most astounding innovation of Notre Dame polyphony was the addition of rhythm to such ornamental voices: the upper voices sing dozens of notes above each step of the chant, regulated by the six modal rhythms. The rhythmic patterns possible (which may shift in each voice phrase to phrase) are each related to a poetic foot: long/short (trochaic), short/long (iambic), long/short/short (dactylic), short/short/long (anapestic), long ...
  • The Close Reading Cooperative: Scansion, part 2 Christopher Hanlon continues the discussion about scansion, iambs, and trochees for the Close Reading Cooperative, the podcast in literary ***ysis for English majors. To subscribe to the podcast and receive weekly installments, visit our instruction page at www.eiu.edu
  • Lament - ANONYMUS (2nd or 3rd c. AD) Oxyrhynchus papyri 4465 GREEK MUSIC
  • Trochaic Theory of Prediction Election Outcome Explained David Lehman explains the theory of scansion that predicts Barack Obama will win the election this fall.
  • "One Word More" by Robert Browning (poetry reading) Browning does the best rants. This isn't the whole poem, I skipped to the to the last stanza, omitting lines 73 to 197. You can read the rest here: The poem with more notes here: www.online- The reason it sounds different from more usual Shakespearian lines is that these are trochaic pentameters, rather than iambic pentameters. (Shakespeare did use this form too, but not often) They go hard/soft rather than soft/hard. Trochaic tetrameters are more common, four feet per line, like Longfellow's Haiwatha. The paintings are by Raphael, whose proper name was Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (1483 -- 1520).
  • Arthur Nobile Jr. at the Rodgers Ruffatti Organ In this exciting clip from The Journey and the Art, Arthur Nobile, Jr. displays his unsurpassed ability to improvise on the melody of the 13th century Latin hymn Dies Irae (Day of Wrath). It is a medieval Latin poem, differing from classical Latin by its accentual (non-quantitative) stress and its rhymed lines. The meter is trochaic. The poem describes the day of judgment, the last trumpet summoning souls before the throne of God, where the saved will be delivered and the unsaved cast into eternal flames, bishops too.
  • TSU's Symphonic Wind Ensemble plays Dies Irae (Day of Wrath) Dies Irae (Day of Wrath)from Manzonie Requiem is a famous thir***th century Latin hymn thought to be written by Thomas of Celano. It is a medieval Latin poem, differing from classical Latin by its accentual (non-quantitative) stress and its rhymed lines. The meter is trochaic. The poem describes the day of judgment, the last trumpet summoning souls before the throne of God, where the saved will be delivered and the unsaved cast into eternal flames. The hymn is used as a sequence in the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass in the extraordinary form (1962 missal). It is not used in the ordinary form (1970) of the Roman Missal.
  • paranoid sped up a great black sabbath song speed up. Paranoid" is a song by Black Sabbath that appears on the band's second album Paranoid.Guitarist Tony Iommi came up with the riff while the rest of the band was out getting lunch. Upon their return they immediately recorded it in as long as it took to play it through. The lyrics had not been written yet so vocalist Ozzy Osbourne sang whatever came to mind. The final version contained different lyrics penned by bassist and principal lyricist, Geezer Butler. Paranoid" was released as a single and received regular airplay on mainstream radio. The single, with "The Wizard" on the B-side, was released in the UK in July 1970 and it reached the number 4. It made number 2 on the Dutch Top 40. The song's lyrics are from the viewpoint of a man suffering from paranoia. Lyrics such as People think I'm insane because / I am frowning all the time and Happiness I cannot feel / And love to me is so unreal state his emotions and the symptoms of mental illness at the same time. The last two lines of the song, And so as you hear these words / Telling you now of my state / I tell you to enjoy life I / Wish I could but it's too late are the chilling message from a man who loses hope and believes he will suffer for the rest of his life. The oddity of the speaker also shows in his unnatural stress pattern, creating a somewhat forced form of trochaic tetrameters. "Paranoid" often enters into lists regarding the 'best' metal or hard rock track. It is typically ...
  • "The Song of the Wandering Aengus" by WB Yeats (poetry reading) Less frequently called "The Song of Wandering Aengus", omitting "the" which seems to be wrong but I don't see that it matters much. This was one the the first poems I uploaded and I was then still fooling around trying to find a good sound format and getting it wrong, indistinct and muffled. So here it is again. I hope it's better. This is an ideal poem if you want to practice reading poetry. It's deceptively simple and shows flaws well. You can hear other people, who habitually read poetry, recite it here: Poetry is more like music than speech. Some people are poem-deaf, which is like tone-deaf, they don't know how it should sound. They don't have the internal voice which recites poetry to them. If they read a poem aloud they ignore metre and rhyme and emphasise the wrong words, as if reading assembly instructions to dimwits. Worse still, they're convinced they're reading well. They're like the oddballs they put through on America's Got Talent for a laugh who are so astonished and angry when they get rejected. Read with stresses according to the metre - which is like saying, "sing the tune" but it's surprising how many don't. Is it iambic? trochaic? where do the stresses fall? Don't let the rhymes take you by surprise. It's a mistake to sacrifice the metre of the line in order to make the point: if it were a song you wouldn't stop singing to shout the punchline, would you? Don't leave unnecessary gaps. If you do it will sound like an itinerary or a recipe ...
  • The Close Reading Cooperative: Scansion, part 1 Christopher Hanlon and Francine McGregor teach you how to scan a line of poetry, how to recognize iambs and trochees when you see them, and why it matters. Part 1 of 2. To subscribe to the podcast and receive weekly installments, visit our instruction page at www.eiu.edu
  • Trochaic Fragment - ANONYMUS (3rd c. AD) GREEK MUSIC
  • Sodomize the Insects - Yjku Unknown Flagelation Contents Hymn meters Main article: Meter (hymn) The meter indicates the number of syllables for the lines in each stanza of a hymn. This provides a means of marrying the hymn's text with an appropriate hymn tune for singing. In practice many hymns conform to one of a relatively small number of meters (syllable patterns). Care must be taken, however, to ensure that not only the meter of words and tune match, but also the stresses on the words in each line. Technically speaking an iambic tune, for instance, cannot be used with words of, say, trochaic meter.
  • One-Take Shakespeare: Verse and Prose In this episode: verse and prose and how to tell the difference, the magical meter, and a terrible pun or so.
  • Edwards and the Transition to Enlightenment Featuring discussions of Raymond Williams's model of culture; Edward Taylor; Jonathan Edwards; Benjamin Franklin; George Whitefield; and the Great Awakening.
  • Let all mortal flesh - Handbell choir 'Let all mortal flesh' - played by Handbell Ringers of Trinity Lutheran Church,Frankfurt and Church of Christ the King,Frankfurt. An ancient chant of Eucharistic devotion based on the verses taken from Habakkuk 2:20 "Let all the earth keep silence before Him" taken from one of the books of the 12 minor prophets of Bible. The original was composed in Greek as a Cherubic Hymn for the Offertory of the Divine Liturgy of St James in the fourth Century AD, with local Churches adopting arrangements in Syriac and English transcription. In modern times, the Ralph Vaughan Williams arrangement of a translation from the Greek by Gerard Moultrie to the tune of Picardy, a French medieval folk melody, popularized the hymn among Christian congregations that worship liturgically. The Moultrie translation is written in 87.87 Trochaic meter. Therefore, winged in the first line of the fourth stanza is correctly read or sung as a single syllable. However, the two syllable variant wingèd has become commonly accepted, especially outside of the United Kingdom.
  • English Words: bragged, plumages, friendships, anticipates, hunting, flickering, overleaf, drawees, Word Definitions. Music By Aalborg Soundtracks, from Audioswap -- see from the album Aalborg Soundtracks Vol. 5, on iTunes definitions of the words: bragged, plumages, friendships, anticipates, hunting, flickering, overleaf, drawees, convener, genitives, trochaic, armaments, unfed, unseats, corkwood, martinet, wrappings, participant, sterile, excommunications
  • English Words: suspiciously, rival, acinous, trochaic, vivaciously, Music By Aalborg Soundtracks, from Audioswap -- see from the album Aalborg Soundtracks Vol. 5, on iTunes definitions of the words: suspiciously, rival, acinous, trochaic, vivaciously, moderation, stuffs, psychiatry, beakless, thighbone, custard, peduncles, duces, pitiable, decides, weaves, acceptable, loftiest, nowise, barrows, revision, unveiling, wellhead, swastikas
  • Stabat Mater: Meditations for the Stations of the Cross The Stabat Mater is recognized as the tenderest and most pathetic hymn of the Middle Ages. In the simplest, and at the same time in the most vivid manner, it represents the Blessed Mother of God plunged in grief and weeping beneath the Cross on which her beloved Son was suffering so unmerited and so painful a death. The historical event (John 19, 25) is narrated in the first, second and fourth stanzas. The remaining stanzas are made up of reflections, affections, petitions, and resolutions arising from the contemplation of Our Lord's bitter sufferings and death. The hymn "Stabat Mater" is ascribed to Jacopone da Todi, OFM (d.1306). METER: Trochaic dimeter. The english translation of the Latin text is by Father Caswall and is perhaps the most extensively used. Composer: Claudio Casciolini (1697 - 1760). LITURGICAL USE : Sequence for the Mass of the Seven Dolors on the Friday after Passion Sunday, and on the 15th of September when another Feast of the Seven Dolors is celebrated. For Divine Office use, the Stabat Mater is divided into three parts for Vespers, Matins and Lauds, as follows: 54 Vespers: Stabat Mater dolorosa. 55 Matins: Sancta Mater istud agas. 56 Lauds: Virgo virginum praeclara. Please also follow the moving devotion of the Psalter of Jesus at: Watch our videos in high definition at our website: Also follow the stations of the cross at:
  • Trochaic Theory of Prediction Election Outcome Explained II David Lehman explains his the trochaic theory and how it predicts that Barack Obama will will this November's election.
  • Dainas in Melngalviju nams, Riga Traditional Latvian music is often set to traditional poetry called dainas. Dainas are very short, usually only one or two stanzas, unrhymed and in a four-footed trochaic metre. This video features a young girl singing a song of the Latvian music folklore in the square of Vecriga (Old Riga) famous for Riga's municipal bulding and the House of the Black Heads.
  • MELVINS -"DIES IRAEA" The Melvins do a classic cover off their new album *** WITH BOOTS: Dies Irae (Day of Wrath) is a famous thir***th century Latin hymn thought to be written by Thomas of Celano. It is a medieval Latin poem, differing from classical Latin by its accentual (non-quantitative) stress and its rhymed lines. The meter is trochaic. The poem describes the day of judgment, the last trumpet summoning souls before the throne of God, where the saved will be delivered and the unsaved cast into eternal flames. ALSO, the opening score to "The Shining".
  • Day of Wrath (Dies Irae) - Requim Dies Irae (Day of Wrath) is a famous thir***th century Latin hymn thought to be written by Thomas of Celano. It is a medieval Latin poem characterized by its accentual stress and its rhymed lines. The metre is trochaic. The poem describes the day of judgment, the last trumpet summoning souls before the throne of God, where the saved will be delivered and the unsaved cast into eternal flames.