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supernovae

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  • Definition of supernovae in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of supernovae. Pronunciation of supernovae. Translations of supernovae. supernovae synonyms, supernovae antonyms. Information about supernovae in the free online English dictionary and. — “supernovae - definition of supernovae by the Free Online”,
  • Encyclopedia article about supernovae. Information about supernovae in the Columbia Encyclopedia, Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, computing dictionary. — “supernovae definition of supernovae in the Free Online”, encyclopedia2
  • A supernova is an exploding star. A high-mass main sequence star evolves into a supergiant, which switchbacks back and forth on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram as its core grows ever hotter and its nuclear furnace produces ever heavier elements. — “Supernovae”, oberlin.edu
  • The photo on the left was taken in 1987 during the supernova explosion of SN 1987A, while the right hand photo was taken beforehand. Supernovae are one of the most energetic explosions in nature, making them like a 1028 megaton bomb (i.e., a few octillion nuclear warheads). — “Supernovae”, imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov
  • Supernovae, the word, is the plural form of supernova (supernovas is too; English can be a fun language). A supernova is a super nova (duh!) – a really,. — “Supernovae | Universe Today”,
  • supernova n. , pl. , -vae , or -vas . A rare celestial phenomenon involving the explosion of most of the material in a star, resulting in an. — “supernova: Definition from ”,
  • Light curves and spectra from the 11 distant supernovae constitute "a strikingly beautiful data set, the largest such set collected solely from space," says Saul Perlmutter, an astrophysicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and leader of the SCP. — “Homing in on dark energy with supernova studies from space”, lbl.gov
  • High redshift supernova search. The history of cosmic expansion, as measured by the high-redshift supernovae, assuming flat cosmic geometry.PDF. — “Supernova Cosmology Project”, www-supernova.lbl.gov
  • Supernovae. Detailed radio observations of extragalactic supernovae are critical to obtaining valuable information about the nature and evolutionary phase of the progenitor star in the period of a few hundred to several tens-of-thousands of years before explosion. — “Supernovae”, ras.ucalgary.ca
  • A Type Ia supernova is caused by the transfer of matter onto a white dwarf. Type II: supernovae WITH hydrogen absorption lines in their spectrum. The type II supernovae are massive stars whose iron cores collapse and then rebound, shock heating the outer layers of the star, which then explode outward. — “Lecture 20: Supernovae”, astronomy.ohio-state.edu
  • A supernova is an explosion of a massive supergiant star. It may shine with the brightness of 10 billion suns! Supernovae are classified as Type I if their light curves exhibit sharp maxima and then die away smoothly and gradually. — “Supernovae”, hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu
  • International Supernovae Network. Supernova Taxonomy by Marcos J. Montes. Supernova Taxonomy by Michael Richmond. SNEWS: SuperNova Early Warning System. J. Font, Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity Massive Stars and their Supernovae, Friedrich-Karl Thielemann, Raphael Hirschi, Matthias. — “Supernovae”, nu.to.infn.it
  • Supernovae (plural form of supernova) are the most violent events in the Universe. The energy emitted during an event can out shine an entire galaxy of billions of stars. The result of a massive star dying, the are fascinating to study, and. — “Supernovae -- Everything You Need To Know About Supernovae”,
  • A list of the latest Supernovae with reference images Most of the supernova information found on this page comes from IAU and CBET circulars and occasionally more data can be found on IAU's List of. — “Bright Supernova”,
  • Young-Earth Creationists claim that there are not enough observed supernova remnants for the universe to be billions of years old. This article debunks this false claim and summarizes what is known about supernovae. — “Supernovae, Supernova Remnants and Young Earth Creationism FAQ”,
  • New Radio Supernova Results (***READ THIS FIRST***) Notes: (1) If you use this data, we would appreciate it if you contact the authors first at [email protected] Please reference this page in any publications which use this. — “Supernova Home Page”, rsd-www.nrl.navy.mil
  • A supernova (plural supernovae) is a stellar explosion that is more energetic than a nova. Supernovae are extremely luminous and cause a burst of radiation that often briefly outshines an entire galaxy, before fading from view over several weeks or months. — “Supernova - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • The use of supernovae as distance indicators has grown dramatically in the last few years. There is every reason to believe that in the next decade supernovae will become still more important as distance indicators. — “Measurement of Galaxy Distances”, nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu
  • Get information, facts, photos, news, videos, and more about the exploding stars called supernovas (supernovae) from National Geographic. — “Supernovas, Supernovae Information, Exploding Star Facts”,
  • One of the most energetic explosive events known is a supernova. There are, however, many remnants of Supernovae explosions in our galaxy, that are seen as X-ray shell like structures caused by the shock wave propagating out into the. — “Supernova - NASA”, heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov
  • The most powerful explosions in the universe are supernovae. More striking than the classical nova are the supernovae, which are given this name because of the tremendous amount of energy they produce. — “The Astrophysics Spectator: An Overview of Supernovae”,
  • The brightness of supernovae relative to other night sky objects is demonstrated in these "before and after" images. location of the supernova progenitor (in the Large Magellanic Cloud), and the left panel shows the same location a few days after the supernova. — “Curious About Astronomy? Supernovae”, curious.astro.cornell.edu
  • Supernovae, as celestial events, are huge releases of tremendous energy, as the star We know that supernovae have occurred in our Galaxy in the past, since both Tycho Brahe and his protege, Johannes Kepler, discovered bright supernovae occurring in the Milky Way in 1572 and 1604, respectively. — “What are Supernovae?”, spider.ipac.caltech.edu

Videos

  • Hubble's view of Supernova 1987A over time Time-series images made by cameras onboard the Hubble Space Telescope show the evolution of the inner remnant of Supernova 1987A. Video courtesy of Peter Challis; NASA
  • Massive Supernova And Nebula Seen In the Universe What secrets do these massive powerful events in our universe hold? Possibly our very future? PLEASE SUBSCRIBE A supernova (plural supernovae) is a stellar explosion that is more energetic than a nova. Supernovae are extremely luminous and cause a burst of radiation that often briefly outshines an entire galaxy, before fading from view over several weeks or months. During this short interval a supernova can radiate as much energy as the Sun is expected to emit over its entire life span. The explosion expels much or all of a star's material at a velocity of up to 30000 km/s (10% of the speed of light), driving a shock wave into the surrounding interstellar medium. This shock wave sweeps up an expanding shell of gas and dust called a supernova remnant. Several types of supernovae exist. Types I and II can be triggered in one of two ways, either turning off or suddenly turning on the production of energy through nuclear fusion. After the core of an aging massive star ceases generating energy from nuclear fusion, it may undergo sudden gravitational collapse into a neutron star or black hole, releasing gravitational potential energy that heats and expels the star's outer layers. Alternatively a white dwarf star may accumulate sufficient material from a stellar companion (either through accretion or via a merger) to raise its core temperature enough to ignite carbon fusion, at which point it undergoes runaway nuclear fusion, completely disrupting it. Stellar cores whose ...
  • Supernova 1987a Observations made with Hubble Space Telescope of the nearby supernova 1987a are allowing astronomers to measure the velocity and composition of "star guts" ejected into space following the explosion, according to a new study led by Kevin France of the Univ. of Colo.-Boulder and including J. Craig Wheeler of The Univ. of TX-Austin. More information: . Video credit: Peter Challis (CfA/Harvard) and NASA
  • Project Universe - Supernovae and Pulsars (3 of 3) Shock waves from supernovae may trigger star formation. Supernovae are the source of cosmic rays.
  • Tycho's Supernova explosion in 1572 animation This animation shows how the explosion of Tycho's Supernova in 1572 most likely took place. In Type Ia supernova binary systems, the more massive star of the pair will age faster and eventually becomes a white dwarf star. When the slower-evolving companion star subsequently ages to the point where it begins to balloon in size, it spills hydrogen onto the dwarf. The hydrogen accumulates, gradually fusing into heavier elements until it reaches a critical and precise mass threshold, called the Chandrasekhar limit, where it explodes as a titanic nuclear fusion bomb. The companion star goes hurtling off into space, retaining the velocity of its orbital motion when the explosion disrupted the system. Credit: NASA, ESA and P. Ruiz-Lapuente (University of Barcelona)
  • Supernova type Ia explosion 3D simulation of the density and temperature in the explosion of Ia type supernova with 6 km resolution for a 25 km initial bubble radius, 100 km ignition offset. Movie from the paper "Three-Dimensional Simulations of the Deflagration Phase of the Gravitationally Confined Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae" Jordan et al., 2007. Movies at 6 km resolution 3D supernova type Ia simulation.
  • New Supernova Is Discovered by Young Citizen Scientist There is no age restriction on the chance to make a significant contribution to our understanding of the universe. Caroline Moore, a 14-year-old from Warwick, NY, has made such a mark on astronomy with the discovery of Supernova 2008ha. Not only is she the youngest person to discover a supernova, but this particular supernova has been identified as a different type of stellar explosion.
  • Crab Supernova explosion Animation of the Crab supernova explosion. Credit: ESA/Hubble
  • Supernova Explosion w/Black Hole kick-out This video shows a black hole and its yellow companion star being sent out on a out on a long journey through the Milky Way galaxy by the explosive kick of a supernova - one of the Universe's most titanic events. New observations made by the ESA/NASA Hubble Space Telescope have allowed astronomers to measure the motion of this black-hole system across the sky using images taken in 1995 and 2001. The results are surprising: the black hole streaks across the plane of our Milky Way at a velocity 4 times that of stars around it! This is the first direct link between black holes and the supernovae that create them. Credit: European Space Agency, NASA and Felix Mirabel (the French Atomic Energy Commission & the Institute for Astronomy and Space Physics/Conicet of Argentina)
  • Scarlet Utopia - Supernovae SCARLET UTOPIA - SUPERNOVAE ------------------------------------------------ Scarlet Utopia: Jean d'Auberlaque Peter "the Saint" Sherman Steven James Tefkey Scarlet Rose Cast: Victim - Jessica Keuthen Old Man - Bernd Grötzner Baby - Elena Nawrat Cop - Michael Hirtz Cop - Dr. Robert Coenen Cop - Daniela Hirtz Doorman - Patrick Keuthen Servant - Sarah Eichhorst Dolorous Lady - Sylvia Nawrat Double Scarlet Rose - Lea Nawrat -------- Production Assistant: Judith Vöcker Executive Producer, Camera: Max Lais Script, Director, Postproduction: Jan Zenkner Produced by Chinzilla Films
  • Slacker Astronomy: Supernova via Lite Bright Astronomy via Lite Brite: The supernova explosion process told through Lite Brite diagrams.
  • Supernova _ the most realistic computer simulation untill now
  • Project Universe - Supernovae and Pulsars (1 of 3) Electron degeneracy pressure limits lower mass stars from burning carbon into oxygen and evolving further. Stars higher than 4 solar masses will go supernova when carbon is burned into oxygen and so on up the atomic numbers until no more nuclear energy is available. The star then collapses catastrophically and ignites a different type of energy process called particle reaction which suddenly release a vast amount of energy, causing the star to blow up.
  • 22. Supernovae Frontiers/Controversies in Astrophysics (ASTR 160) Professor Bailyn offers a review of what is known so far about the expansion of the universe from observing galaxies, supernovae, and other celestial phenomena. The rate of the expansion of the universe is discussed along with the Big Rip theory and the balance of dark energy and dark matter in the universe over time. The point at which the universe shifts from accelerating to decelerating is examined. Worries related to the brightness of high redshift supernovae and the effects of gravitational lensing are explained. The lecture also describes current project designs for detecting supernovae at high or intermediate redshift, such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: open.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2007.
  • Project Universe - Supernovae and Pulsars (2 of 3) Massive stars explode when electrons and protons are crushed together into neutrons. Pulsars are rotating neutron stars beaming energy along its magnetic pole in our direction. Note: William J ***e (shown in video) made the first-ever optical observation of a pulsar in 1968 by looking into the Crab Nebula.
  • GRAVITY Part 3 Black holes and supernova [Robin Allott If gravity is repulsion and not attraction what different account can be given of strange features of the cosmos?
  • Supernova explosion A supernova (pl. supernovae) is a stellar explosion. Supernovae are extremely luminous and cause a burst of radiation that often briefly outshines an entire galaxy, before fading from view over several weeks or months. During this short interval, a supernova can radiate as much energy as the Sun could emit over its entire life span.[1] The explosion expels much or all of a star's material[2] at a velocity of up to 30000 km/s (a tenth the speed of light), driving a shock wave[3] into the surrounding interstellar medium. This shock wave sweeps up an expanding shell of gas and dust called a supernova remnant.
  • The Cosmic Classroom - Novae and Supernovae
  • supernova explosion A stronger star sucking the fuel of a nearby smaller star.!!
  • Supernova (Supernovae)
  • Supernovae Supernovae, exploding stars.
  • Animation Of Supernova Aftermath [720p] This video animation shows the remnant of the explosion of a supermassive star. Stars greater that eight times the mass of our Sun will self-detonate as supernovae. Supernovae can briefly outshine an entire galaxy, before fading from view over several weeks or months. During this short interval, a supernova radiates as much energy as the Sun could emit over its entire lifespan. The star is shredded and blown into the surrounding interstellar medium. This shock wave sweeps up an expanding shell of gas and dust called a supernova remnant. Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopic observations have yielded the chemistry cooked up by the supernova, including oxygen, nitrogen and carbon the basis of life as we know it.
  • White dwarf star explosion into a Ia type supernova 3D simulation of the density and the reaction progress variable in the explosion of Ia type supernova with 6 km resolution for a 18 km initial bubble radius, 42 km ignition offset. Movie from the paper "Three-Dimensional Simulations of the Deflagration Phase of the Gravitationally Confined Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae" Jordan et al., 2007. Movies at 6 km resolution 3D supernova type Ia simulation.
  • Type IA Supernovae en. A supernova is one way that a star can end its life, exploding in a display of grandiose fireworks. One family of supernovae, called Type Ia supernovae, are of particular interest in cosmology as they can be used as standard candles to measure distances in the Universe and so can be used to calibrate the accelerating expansion that is driven by dark energy. One defining characteristic of Type Ia supernovae is the lack of hydrogen in their spectrum. Yet hydrogen is the most common chemical element in the Universe. Such supernovae most likely arise in systems composed of two stars, one of them being the end product of the life of sun-like stars, or white dwarfs. When such white dwarfs, acting as stellar vampires that suck matter from their companion, become heavier than a given limit, they become unstable and explode. Video credit: ESO Original file downloaded from: tr. Üstnovalar, gösterişli bir patlama eşliğinde bir yıldızın ömrünü tamamlayış şekillerinden biridir. Üstnovalar çeşitlidirler ve bunlardan Ia türündekilerevrenbiliminde gökadakaların arasındaki uzaklıkların ölçülmesine ve cisimlerin birbirlerinden karanlık enerji sayesinde hangi oranlarda uzaklaştıklarının anlaşılmasına yardımcı olurlar. Ia türü üstnovaların en belirgin özelliklerinden biri elde edilen tayflarda hidrojen çizgilerinin bulunmuyor olmasıdır ki evrendeki en bol bulunan kimyasal element hidrojendir. Bu türdeki üstnovalar genelde ikili yıldız sistemlerinde görülür. Güneş benzeri bir ...
  • Supernova birth seen for first time Date- 22 May 09 Source- www.ciw.edu 'Astronomers have seen the aftermath of spectacular stellar explosions known as supernovae before, but until now no one has witnessed a star dying in real time. While looking at another object in the spiral galaxy NGC 2770, using NASAs orbiting Swift telescope, Carnegie-Princeton fellows* Alicia Soderberg and Edo Berger detected an extremely luminous blast of X-rays released by a supernova explosion. They alerted 8 other orbiting and on-ground telescopes to turn their eyes on this first-of-its-kind event.' More info- www.ciw.edu
  • Echoes Of A Supernova Science & Reason on Facebook: The Hidden Universe (Episode 20): Cassiopeia A - Echoes of a Supernova A supernova flash echoing through surrounding dust clouds has given astronomers a virtual time machine for studying the light from the explosion that nobody saw. This is the Hidden Universe of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, exploring the mysteries of infrared astronomy with your host Dr. Robert Hurt. --- Please subscribe to Science & Reason: • • • • --- It's the 17th century supernova that nobody saw, but telescopes in space and on Earth have teamed up to look back in time and study it today! When a massive star reaches its end of days it explodes dramatically and, for a few months, can outshine anything else in the galaxy. Earlier supernovas had been seen by many, often shining brighter than the planets. Of course with no witnesses, and no records, it's difficult to tell exactly what kind of supernova it was. A team led by astronomer Oliver Krause has, over the last few years, made a remarkable series of infrared observations of the region. These Spitzer Space Telescope images show shifting patterns of glowing dust beyond the remnant itself. These changes are so fast that they indicate motion at the speed of light! To get what's happening we have to remember that light moves fast, but in such a vast galaxy it still takes a while for it to get anywhere. Cassiopeia A (Cas A) itself is about 11000 ...
  • Born In The Wake Of A Supernova
  • Star Death: Supernovae and Black Holes Nebula formation, dead and dying stars and black holes. Help save UK astronomy! All video clips courtesy of NASA JPL/Caltech, ESA, BBC and other internet sources.
  • Supernova explosion: Computer simulation up to 9000 seconds Computer simulation up to 9000 seconds (Visualisation: Markus Rampp, Rechenzentrum Garching). Original publication: NJ Hammer, H.-Th. Janka, E. Müller, "Three-dimensional simulations of mixing instabilities in supernova explosions", The Astrophysical Journal 714 (2010) 1371-1385 ( Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching managed for the first time to reproduce the asymmetries and fast-moving iron clumps of observed supernovae by complex computer simulations in all three dimensions. To this end they successfully followed the outburst in their models consistently from milliseconds after the onset of the blast to the demise of the star several hours later. (Astrophysical Journal, 10 May 2010)
  • The Orb - Supernova At The End Of The Universe
  • Supernovas: When Stars Die When a star explodes, it leaves behind a debris field of stellar material and high-energy particles known as a supernova remnant. Astronomers use Chandra to study these remnants that can produce intense X-ray radiation for thousands of years. Supernova remnants are responsible for seeding cloud that formed our Sun, planets, and ultimately us with elements like nitrogen and oxygen.
  • Cassiopeia A Supernova - Expanding The Cassiopeia A supernova remnant seen expanding over the course of seven years. Looking for more videos about space? Visit Credit: NASA/CXC/MIT/laney et al.
  • 'Peanut' stars may explain rare supernovae Read more: Inside the dwarf galaxy Holmberg IX, two bright, massive stars orbit each other so closely that they share material and resemble a peanut. Such "yellow supergiant eclipsing binaries" may trigger rare types of supernovae (Courtesy of Kevin Gecsi/Ohio State University)
  • SMWCP - 64 - those supernovae "Orbital Fortress" - yoshicookiezeus "Asteroid Belt" - K3fka Whew, glad we managed to solve that puzzle! http
  • Using type 1a supernova to measure distances in astronomy Type 1a supernova are created by the same processes in which the explosions are all of the same magnitude. The video explains the accepted ideas on how they are caused and how they are used to estimate distances.
  • Supernova clarification
  • Final Fantasy VII - #61 - Sephiroth's Super Nova Safer Sephiroth's Limit: Super Nova.
  • Supernova explosion: Computer simulation of the first 500 milliseconds Source: Leonhard Scheck, Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics. Original publication: NJ Hammer, H.-Th. Janka, E. Müller, "Three-dimensional simulations of mixing instabilities in supernova explosions", The Astrophysical Journal 714 (2010) 1371-1385 ( Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching managed for the first time to reproduce the asymmetries and fast-moving iron clumps of observed supernovae by complex computer simulations in all three dimensions. To this end they successfully followed the outburst in their models consistently from milliseconds after the onset of the blast to the demise of the star several hours later. (Astrophysical Journal, 10 May 2010)
  • Kathryn Aurora Gray - Youngest Supernova Discovery Age is no barrier when it comes to supernova hunting, as 10-year-old Kathryn Gray has just proven. The Canadian schoolgirl was scanning through astronomical images on Jan. 2 when she made the record-breaking find. According to the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Kathryn is the the youngest ever discoverer of a supernova. The supernova was spotted erupting to life in the constellation of Camelopardalis in a galaxy called UGC 3378, some 240 million light-years distant. Shining at a brightness of magnitude 17, the flash was imaged on New Year's Eve. Magnitude 17 is the approximate brightness of the dwarf planet Haumea (in the Kuiper Belt) as seen from Earth. Helped by her amateur astronomer father Paul Gray, Kathryn was taught how to look out for these transient flashes using a computer program that compares new and old images of the same portion of the night sky. Blinking between the new and old images, anything like the motion of planets, asteroids or supernovae can be spotted. It is an arduous task, and a significant discovery for any astronomer, but Kathryn was determined to become the youngest person to make a supernova discovery. "I'm really excited. It feels really good," Kathryn told the Canada Star newspaper on Monday. Kathryn showed an interest in astronomy last year and became fascinated with trying to find a supernova when she learned that the previous record was held by a 14-year-old. The supernova, called SN 2010lt, was observed by Dave Lane, an amateur ...
  • Cassiopeia A Supernova - 3-D Fly-Through A 3-D animation of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant from eight years of data. Looking for more videos about space? Visit Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO/D.Patnaude et
  • Thorton - Supernovae Higher Quality: Time Spent: 7 hours(Continuous) Programs: FL Studio 9 Demo Magix Music Maker 17 Download Version
  • Black holes, Supernovae and What not A collection of cool animations on black holes, supernovae, the Milky Way and the upcoming inflation of the sun.