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staphylococci

Examples

  • Vancomycin resistance has been reported in clinical isolates of both coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus. The emerging threat of widespread vancomycin resistance poses a serious public health concern given the fact that. — “Vancomycin Resistance in Staphylococci”, m.nih.gov
  • Staphylococci ( staph') are a common type of bacteria that live on the skin and mucous membranes (eg. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is the most important of these bacteria in human diseases. — “Staphylococcal skin infections. DermNet NZ”,
  • The staphylococci are in the Bacterial family Micrococcaceae, but they are phylogenetically unrelated to any other genera in the family. Staphylococcus aureus forms a fairly large yellow colony on rich medium, S. epidermidis has a relatively small white colony. — “Staphylococcus”,
  • staphylococcus n. , pl. , -cocci . A spherical gram-positive parasitic bacterium of the genus Staphylococcus, usually occurring in grapelike. — “staphylococcus: Definition from ”,
  • {Gram-negative infections in severe thermal injury}; Panova IuM et al.; Among 78 patients with persistant bacteriemia the latter was induced by staphylococci in 59 and by gram-negative microflora in 19 patients . In 14 of 19 patients gram-negative septicemia was preceded by staphylococcic one. — “Staphylococcus”,
  • Examples of coagulase-negative staphylococci: S. epidermidis, S. saprophyticus Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) 20 species ~11 species that infect humans. Major. — “Staphylococci”, channing.harvard.edu
  • Noun. staphylococci. Plural form of staphylococcus. Retrieved from " /wiki/staphylococci" Categories: English plurals | English irregular. — “staphylococci - Wiktionary”,
  • Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology Staphylococcus aureus chapter discusses the bacterium Staphylococcus, including MRSA, the staph superbug. — “Staphylococcus aureus”,
  • Staphylococci definition, any of several spherical bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus, occurring in pairs, tetrads, and irregular clusters, certain species of which See more. — “Staphylococci | Define Staphylococci at ”,
  • Definition of staphylococci from Webster's New World College Dictionary. Meaning of staphylococci. Pronunciation of staphylococci. Definition of the word staphylococci. Origin of the word staphylococci. — “staphylococci - Definition of staphylococci at ”,
  • Staphylococci. Lifestyle, fitness & health information about Staphylococci. Characteristics of Staphylococci, Diseases Caused by Staphylococci, A List of Staph Strains, Characteristics of Staphylococc. — “Staphylococci | ”,
  • Top questions and answers about Staphylococci. Find 162 questions and answers about Staphylococci at Read more. — “Staphylococci - ”,
  • brief discussion of the clinical role of coagulase negative staphylococci, such as Staphylococcus Structural components: The cell envelope of staphylococci is composed of a microcapsule and a. — “Staphylococci”, columbia.edu
  • Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are common colonizers of the human skin and the most frequent constituent of the normal flora at this site. Once considered relatively avirulent and usually a contaminant when isolated from a clinical. — “Coagulase-negative staphylococci: Antimicrobial resistance”,
  • Overview: Staphylococcal infections are usually caused by the organism Staphylococcus aureus. However, the incidence of infections due to Staphylococcus epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci has been steadily increasing in. — “Staphylococcal Infections: eMedicine Infectious Diseases”,
  • Read about Staph infection symptoms, signs (boils, rash), causes (Staphylococcus aureus bacteria), types, treatment (antibiotics) and complications (impetigo, cellulitis). — “Staph Infection (Staphylococcus Aureus) - ”,
  • Staphylococci, or staph, is a bacteria present in a harmless form in 15 to 40 percent of Americans. Staphcillin, that once was effective against staphylococci (staph) resistant to penicillin because they. — “Staphylococci - Kosmix : Reference, Videos, Images, News”,
  • Encyclopedia article about staphylococci. Information about staphylococci in the Columbia Encyclopedia, Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, computing dictionary. — “staphylococci definition of staphylococci in the Free Online”, encyclopedia2
  • STAPHYLOCOCCUS sp. Gram-positive cocci. non motile. non spore forming. non capsulated STAPHYLOCOCCUS spp. most often found as origin of human diseases. — “Staphylococci”, lfhk.cuni.cz
  • Translations of staphylococci. staphylococci synonyms, staphylococci antonyms. Information about staphylococci in the free online A spherical gram-positive parasitic bacterium of the genus Staphylococcus, usually occurring in grapelike clusters and causing boils, septicemia, and other infections. — “staphylococci - definition of staphylococci by the Free”,
  • Staphylococcus (from the Greek: σταφυλή, staphylē, "bunch of grapes" and κόκκος, kókkos, "granule") is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria. Assignment of a strain to the genus Staphylococcus requires that it is a Gram-positive coccus that forms. — “Staphylococcus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are opportunistic bacteria that are frequently part of the human microflora and may cause disease when the immune system becomes compromised. S. aureus together with CNS account. — “Staphylococci — ITQB”, itqb.unl.pt
  • Capsule or slime layer (diffuse capsule) may be present more commonly in vivo; Particularly important in Staphylococcus epidermidis colonization Staphylococci are common flora: skin, nasal cavity, oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract. Transient. — “BSCI 424 Pathogenic Microbiology -- Staphylococcus”, life.umd.edu

Videos

  • Staphylococcus aureus - Zonex Time Lapse video of ZONEX antimicrobial catheter dressing inhibting the growth of Staphylococcus aureus (NHS clinical isolate). Visit for more information.
  • What Drives You? Drive deodorant is a new, all-natural purifying deodorant. Drive uses a variety of natural extracts to purify and absorb the wearer's perspiration, in the process cleansing the odor of the perspiration. Several types of concentrated oils (Tea Tree, Chamomile, Coriander, Flower, Sage, Rosemary) as well as low levels of ethanol, are used to purify the bad-odor causing bacteria in the wearer's sweat. Perspiration is an odorless sweat that consists of 99 percent pure water along with traces of salt and potassium. But some areas of the body (including the armpit) can attract certain bacteria to breed.These microorganisms digest components of sweat and release volatile chemicals that are responsible for the acrid smell of "body odor". Some of the common bacteria responsible for body odor include micrococci, staphylococci, corneforms, and pityrosporum species, all of which can be eliminating through exposure to the ingredients in Drive. The wearer is left with only his natural scent (pheromones). Sodium Bicarbonate (baking soda) and cornstarch are then used for the lubrication of the area, as well as, to absorb any excessive perspiration in the region. Finally, a beeswax-derived supporting solid is used to protect the structural integrity of the stick, and provide a strong enough backbone to extend the product shelf-life in its container.
  • What Drives You? Drive deodorant is a new, all-natural purifying deodorant. Drive uses a variety of natural extracts to purify and absorb the wearer's perspiration, in the process cleansing the odor of the perspiration. Several types of concentrated oils (Tea Tree, Chamomile, Coriander, Flower, Sage, Rosemary) as well as low levels of ethanol, are used to purify the bad-odor causing bacteria in the wearer's sweat. Perspiration is an odorless sweat that consists of 99 percent pure water along with traces of salt and potassium. But some areas of the body (including the armpit) can attract certain bacteria to breed.These microorganisms digest components of sweat and release volatile chemicals that are responsible for the acrid smell of "body odor". Some of the common bacteria responsible for body odor include micrococci, staphylococci, corneforms, and pityrosporum species, all of which can be eliminating through exposure to the ingredients in Drive. The wearer is left with only his natural scent (pheromones). Sodium Bicarbonate (baking soda) and cornstarch are then used for the lubrication of the area, as well as, to absorb any excessive perspiration in the region. Finally, a beeswax-derived supporting solid is used to protect the structural integrity of the stick, and provide a strong enough backbone to extend the product shelf-life in its container.
  • Folliculitis NYC - (212)-644-9494 - NYC Folliculitis (212)-644-9494 Folliculitis is an inflammation of the pilosebaceous follicle. Pustule formation usually suggests an infective origin, most commonly staphylococci, but chemical causes are common. Chemicals can include topical tar derivatives and oils. Idiopathic folliculitis of the scalp can be related to stress. Eosinophilic folliculitis may be seen in patients infected with HIV. Treatment: When of bacterial origin, treatment should be directed at the offending organism whether Gram-positive, Gram-negative or yeast. Systemic agents are usually required. When secondary exposure to chemicals, reduction in the exposure is required for clearing. Folliculitis secondary to yeast, Pityrosporum folliculitis, responds well to oral ketoconazole 200 mg daily for 5 to 10 days. Idiopathic folliculitis usually responds well to tetracycline 0.5-1 gram daily or minocycline 100 mg daily or bid.
  • DIRTY-MAY-BE-HEALTHY.MOV Apparently, current research shows that children who occasionally get dirty, benefit from the bacteria, namely Staphylococci, which interfere with an overactive inflammatory response that can cause more swelling of cuts or bruises. This seems to support the "hygiene hypothesis" that supported the notion that if a child was not exposed to diseases, their resistance was less. So, a little dirt seems to be good for kids.
  • Eavesdropping on bacterial conversations Listening in on bacterial conversations could be the solution for improving chronic wound care, says a team of researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Their findings have been published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology. Bacteria, often viewed as simplistic creatures, are in fact very sociable units of life, said Alex Rickard, assistant professor of biological sciences. They can physically and chemically interact with one another and are quite selective about who they hang out with. How bacteria might communicate in chronic wounds, however, was somewhat of a mystery. Working with researchers and physicians at the Center for Biofilm Engineering at Montana State University and the South West Regional Wound Care Center in Lubbock, Texas, Rickard and a team of undergraduate researchers were able to identify specific types of chronic wound bacteria and to test their ability to produce cell-cell signaling molecules. Partial gene sequencing allowed the team to identify 46 chronic wound strains belonging to nine genera. Further research inferred that close to 70 percent of those chronic wound strains produce a specific type of communication molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2). A smaller percentage around 20 percent produce a different type of communication molecules that are called acyl-homoserine-lactones (AHLs). Scientists already know that structurally different bacterial cell-cell signaling molecules are able to mediate cell-cell communication ...
  • What are Bacteria and Bacterial Infections Part 3 A number of bacteria produce extracellular proteins, which break down host tissues, encourage the spread of the organism and aid the establishment and maintenance of disease. These proteins, which are mostly enzymes, are called virulence factors. For example, streptococci, staphylococci and pneumococci produce hyaluronidase, an enzyme that breaks down hyaluronic acid, a host tissue cement. They also produce proteases, nucleases and lipases that depolymerize host proteins, nucleic acids and fats. Clostridia that cause gas gangrene produce collagenase, and -toxin, which breaks down the collagen network supporting the tissues. The ways in which pathogens bring about damage to the host are diverse. Only rarely are symptoms of a disease due simply to the presence of a large number of microorganisms, although a large mass of bacterial cells can block vessels or heart valves or clog the air passages of the lungs. In many cases, pathogenic bacteria produce toxins that are responsible for host damage. Toxins released extracellularly are called exotoxins, and these may travel from the focus of infection to distant parts of the body and cause damage in regions far removed from the site of microbial growth.
  • Portable Handheld UV Disinfector Quick Overview It adopted the technology of high frequency UVC that has the highest sterilizing efficiency and is harmless to human body. Thus it can thoroughly kill the bacteria and virus including bacillus coli, golden yellow color staphylococci, bacillus, dark mutated spores as well as mildew source substances, hepatitis, flu and other viruses which would give rise to diseases. As a portable substance surface sterilizing apparatus with superexcellent properties today, it takes effect only in a few seconds.
  • DUSTY-KIDS-HEALTHY.mov Apparently, current research shows that children who occasionally get dirty, benefit from the bacteria, namely Staphylococci, which interfere with an overactive inflammatory response that can cause more swelling of cuts or bruises. This seems to support the "hygiene hypothesis" that supported the notion that if a child was not exposed to diseases, their resistance was less. So, a little dirt seems to be good for kids.
  • "The Enemy Bacteria" (1945) - Part III PART III of III. A Walter Lantz Production for the United States Navy, 1945. Directed by Dick Lundy. Animated by Grim Natwick among others. Layout and Design by Art Heinemann. Voices of the staphylococcus and streptococcus germs provided by Mel Blanc. Public domain.
  • Acne NYC- NYC Acne - (212)-644-9494 - New York, NY (212)-644-9494 Acne Dermatologist of Manhattan Acne Dermatologist of NYC Dermatology New York Board Certified Dermatologist Acne is one of the most common of all skin problems. It affects most ***agers to some degree and even more adults. Acne shows up as whiteheads, blackheads, pimples and deep painful bumps that look like boils. Acne most commonly occurs on the face but can also appear on the neck, back, chest and shoulders. It is estimated that as many as 80% of people between 12 and 25 years of age suffer from acne. While in most people, acne clears up after few years, many suffer from permanent scarring of the skin. Even when there are few physical marks left, the emotional ones can be devastating. Acne problems are commonly faced by many young adults and ***agers today. Some people develop acne even at forties and fifties. According to Dr. Rothfeld at NYC Dermatology acne is believed to develop due to various factors like hormonal imbalance, sebum secretion, hereditary factors, and food habits. Inflammatory lesions in acne Inflammatory lesions in acne (pimples or zits) include small red bumps (papules), pustules, large red bumps (nodules) and cysts (these are fluctuant nodules). They are often painful.What is the cause of inflammatory acne? They usually result from rupture of the wall of the closed comedone but may arise from normal-appearing skin. The factors contributing to inflammation are: * Bacteria Chemicals produced by ...
  • Variations in iLife Thinking about what variationmaps and mapping means in how we portray ourselves (and are portrayed by those interfacing us) in co-production. Carefully working on the granularity of how we capture what we are and do must be an important part of 5P work? Lessening or increasing variation just by working on the scales. Variation is always infinite? At home we got a Piko-6 microspirometer off Amazon this week. Now experiencing the vast difference between only PEF and FEV1+FEV6+FEV1/FEV6, most practicaly with regard to both Sonia and measuring (six seconds is something long tiresome and obstruction inducing) and with regard to IT (how to visualize measures, reference values, meds, symptoms and observations). I have not yet understood how to use the new source. We are currently struggling with asthma, pollen allergies and staphylococci --- what is what and what to do. I reflect on variation. We now can show greater variation from our side, but how can this improve our collaboration with the CF team. Until now, the physicians have accepted and encouraged our PEF measuring as part of the asthma treatment --- but now I am trying to develop it so it can be usefully part of more (long-term trends, infections, asthma, PHR/EHR, research...?). Understanding variation and the shape we have in the eyes of the beholder. Then tuning this to the right frequency.
  • INTRO-MULTIPLY RESISTANT-BACTERIA-INCOMPLETE.MOV This was the first version of a short video raising concern on bacteria that are becoming resistant to antibiotics. The health establishment here in the States has acknowledged that, overall, not much progress has been made with this very serious issue. In fact, a health and human services report has shown a rise in hospital acquired infections. And there are Vancomycin resistant strains of MRSA reported, so-called "VRSA". Although they are considered rare, so was MRSA many years ago, and now, it has surfaced in the communities , going beyond hospital confinement. "Because vancomycin-resistant staphylococci are very rare, vancomycin has long been considered the gold standard for treating MRSA infections. Unfortunately, despite its in vitro activity, when vancomycin is used as single-drug therapy to treat MRSA infections, cure rates in serious infections have been very disappointing. Sakoulas (3) has reported 44% failures in treating bacteremia, and Moise and Schentag (4) have shown 40% failures in treating lower respiratory-tract infections."
  • The first vaccine against bovine mas*** ¿How does the first vaccine against bovine mas*** works like? STARTVAC activates cows and heifers immunity, preventing intramammary infections and reducing clinical and subclinical cases of mastitis produced by E. coli, coliforms, S.aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci, as well as the severity of clinical and sub-clinical cases...
  • Fluoroquinolones: Mechanisms of Action and Resistance Developed and produced by Animation Description In this animation, we demonstrate the biology of DNA replication leading to bacterial cell division in a gram positive bacterium, such as S. pneumoniae. The DNA is shown as a circular double strand within the bacterial cell. Like the DNA of all living organisms, it contains the unique genetic code for all of the proteins required for bacterial survival. Bacteria replicate by a process known as binary fission whereby one bacterium separates into 2 new daughter cells. However, before this can occur, the bacterium must make an identical copy of its complete circular DNA. DNA replication requires that the two strands of DNA separate so that the genetic code of the bacterium can be read and a new complimentary strand can be created for each of the original strands. To accomplish this, various enzymes known as helicases break the hydrogen bonds between the bases in the two DNA strands, unwind the strands from each other, and stabilize the exposed single strands, preventing them from joining back together. The points at which the two strands of DNA separate to allow replication of DNA are known as replication forks. The enzymes DNA polymerase then move along each strand of DNA, behind each replication fork synthesizing new DNA strands (in red) complementary to the original ones. As the replication forks move forward, positive superhelical twists in the DNA begin to accumulate ahead of them. In order for ...
  • Folliculitis NYC - (212)-644-9494 - NYC Folliculitis - New York, NY (212)-644-9494 Folliculitis Folliculitis is an inflammation of the pilosebaceous follicle. Pustule formation usually suggests an infective origin, most commonly staphylococci, but chemical causes are common. Chemicals can include topical tar derivatives and oils. Idiopathic folliculitis of the scalp can be related to stress. Eosinophilic folliculitis may be seen in patients infected with HIV. Treatment: When of bacterial origin, treatment should be directed at the offending organism whether Gram-positive, Gram-negative or yeast. Systemic agents are usually required. When secondary exposure to chemicals, reduction in the exposure is required for clearing. Folliculitis secondary to yeast, Pityrosporum folliculitis, responds well to oral ketoconazole 200 mg daily for 5 to 10 days. Idiopathic folliculitis usually responds well to tetracycline 0.5-1 gram daily or minocycline 100 mg daily or bid. Welcome to New York Dermatology headed by Board Certified Dermatologist Dr. Gary Rothfeld in New York, NY the most advanced Dermatology and skin care center in New York City, Manhattan and the world. We offer the perfect blend of aesthetics and science for all your skin care needs.
  • UV Nano Toothbrush Did you know that a recent study at Manchester University found that the average toothbrush contained around 10 million germs, including a high percentage of potentially fatal bacteria and virus such as staphylococci, streptococcus, E. coli and the common cold and flu viruses. The ZADRO UV TOOTHBRUSH DISINFECTANT SCANNER uses the same ultraviolet light technology that is used to sanitize medical facilities. The ZADRO UV TOOTHBRUSH DISINFECTANT SCANNER is a must have for the home, office and when traveling to eliminate 99.9% of bacteria and virus contaminants on your toothbrush. The ZADRO UV DISINFECTANT SCANNER is easy to use, fits into almost any bathroom, travel bag or purse. The streamlined design will hold all manual toothbrushes, most electric toothbrush heads, tweezers, makeup brushes, finger nail clippers, along with many other items. Just place the item into the ZADRO UV TOOTHBRUSH DISINFECTANT SCANNER, close the lid and it automatically begins disinfecting. Within 5 minutes, the ZADRO UV DISINFECTANT SCANNER will automatically shut off and your item will be ready for a 99.9% bacteria and virus free use.
  • naughty cat Original song: "Smelly Cat" - Phoebe Buffay - /watch?v=XNXIZuIBJKs Musical parody: "Naughty cat" -***in- Lyrics: Naughty cat, naughty cat, Why do you bite people? Naughty cat, naughty cat, You have microbes. Now I got lymphangitis, Leukocytosis, Fever and...
  • Allergies or Sinusitis? [ABC: 5-23-2011] Subscribe for daily health news. Like/Dislike, Favorite, Comment, Embed on Blog, Facebook Share, and Tweet this video. Get the word out on this video. - Tuesday May 24 2011 3:36 am Sinusitis is inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, which may be due to infection, allergy, or autoimmune issues. Most cases are due to a viral infection and resolve over the course of 10 days. It is a common condition with more than 24 million cases occurring in the United States annually. Sinusitis can be acute (going on less than four weeks), subacute (4--8 weeks) or chronic (going on for 8 weeks or more). All three types of sinusitis have similar symptoms, and are thus often difficult to distinguish. Acute sinusitis is very common. Roughly ninety percent of adults have had sinusitis at some point in their life. Acute sinusitis is usually precipitated by an earlier upper respiratory tract infection, generally of viral origin. If the infection is of bacterial origin, the most common three causative agents are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Until recently, Haemophilus influenzae was the most common bacterial agent to cause sinus infections. However, introduction of the H. influenza type B (Hib) vaccine has dramatically decreased H. influenza type B infections and now non-typable H. influenza (NTHI) are predominantly seen in clinics. Other sinusitis-causing bacterial pathogens include Staphylococcus aureus and other streptococci ...
  • Weight Loss - How I Will Lose 80LBS This is the weight loss journey of a used to be dime piece skinny chic turned pretty faced fat chic. I am a foodie. These blogs will be like outlines to my success. This is my poor version of "weight watchers" meetings.
  • "The Enemy Bacteria" (1945) - Part I PART I of III. A Walter Lantz Production for the United States Navy, 1945. Directed by Dick Lundy. Animated by Grim Natwick among others. Layout and Design by Art Heinemann. Voices of the staphylococcus and streptococcus germs provided by Mel Blanc. Public domain.
  • "The Enemy Bacteria" (1945) - Part II PART II of III. A Walter Lantz Production for the United States Navy, 1945. Directed by Dick Lundy. Animated by Grim Natwick among others. Layout and Design by Art Heinemann. Voices of the staphylococcus and streptococcus germs provided by Mel Blanc. Public domain.