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rotifers

Examples

  • Stunning photographs and descriptions of rotifers by Wim van Egmond. — “Rotifers”, microscopy-
  • Although rotifers may be easily found in salty water, they are both more diverse and often more abundant in freshwater habitats. And in them, rotifers thrive. In point of fact, these small "here. — “Nano-Animals, Part I: Rotifers by Ronald L. Shimek, Ph.D”,
  • This quote is by a Mr. Baker, who addressed the President of the Royal Society in London in 1744 on the subject of rotifers. In primitive rotifers, the corona was a large ventrical ciliated area called the buccal field that surrounded the mouth. — “Alison Kenny”, academics.smcvt.edu
  • The rotifers are a phylum of tiny animals which are common in freshwater environments, such as ponds and puddles.[1] Some rotifers are free swimming, others move by inching along, and some are fixed.[2] A few species live in Rotifers were first described when early microscopes became available,. — “Rotifers - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • rotifer n. Any of various minute multicellular aquatic organisms of the phylum Rotifera, having at the anterior end a wheellike ring of cilia. — “rotifer: Definition from ”,
  • Rotifers are microscopic animals in the phylum Rotifera, which encompasses over two thousand species. If you have a microscope, you can probably see some rotifers for yourself by taking a water sample from a neighboring stream or pond; you will probably also find some other microscopic. — “What are Rotifers?”,
  • A few rotifers have evolved symbiotic relationships with other species, for example Although parasitism is not common among rotifers in general, there is one major exception: The Acanthocephala, until recently. — “Rotifera - Encyclopedia of Life”,
  • Recent work indicates that rotifers may be important in packaging Once food has entered the rotifer mouth, it is ground by the trophi, plate-like structures which serve as. — “GLERL/Sea Grant: Great Lakes Water Life Photo Gallery”, glerl.noaa.gov
  • This page contains a phase contrast photomicrograph of a stained rotifer. Rotifers were first discovered in the 1600s by Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, one of the first microscopists to study and describe microscopic organisms. — “Molecular Expressions Microscopy Primer: Specialized”, micro.magnet.fsu.edu
  • The Rotifer and Rotifer Home Culture. Last month we dove into the home culture and production of "greenwater", which are the basic food item for enriching prey items that will feed our new fish larvae. Brachionus rotifers are 200-350 mm holoplankton, which means they are permanent. — “Breeder's Net”,
  • The rotifers (commonly called wheel animals) make up a phylum of microscopic and near Some rotifers are free swimming and truly planktonic, others move by inchworming along the substrate, and some are sessile, living inside tubes or gelatinous holdfasts that are attached to. — “Rotifer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • Translations of Rotifers. Rotifers synonyms, Rotifers antonyms. Information about Rotifers in the free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. rotifer - minute aquatic multicellular organisms having a ciliated wheel-like organ for feeding and locomotion; constituents of freshwater plankton. — “Rotifers - definition of Rotifers by the Free Online”,
  • But rotifers have higher ability to tolerate eutrophication than the predators. Rotifers are valuable live food for larval fish and crustacean culture. — “References - Production and Application of Rotifers in”,
  • Rob Toonen writes on rotifers and there role in captive breeding of fish, Aquarium Net has numerous articles written by the leading authors for the advanced aquarist. — “: Where Reefkeeping Begins on the Internet”,
  • Some species of rotifers are free swimming and are called plank-tonic and some other species move by inch-warming. Rotifers are small in size and have soft-body, so they are not highly favored for the fossilization. — “Rotifers, Invertebrates, Animals, Endangered Animals Species”,
  • Rotifers comprise a phylum, Rotifera, of microscopic and near-microscopic, multicellular aquatic animals. Rotifers are pseudocoelomate invertebrates—that is, they have a fluid filled "false body cavity" that is only partly lined by mesoderm rather than a cavity within the mesoderm. — “Rotifer - New World Encyclopedia”,
  • A web resource for light microscopists seeking to identify rotifers and other fresh water micro organisms. An introduction to rotifers with photomicrographs of bdelloid rotifers. — “Fresh Water Rotifers: A general introduction with”,
  • Environmental Engineering and Consulting Company that provides onsite training, consulting, Bioaugmentation products, Lab services and Training materials Rotifers are characterized by the possession of a ciliated area or a funnel-shaped structure at the anterior end that may look like rotating. — “Rotifer”,
  • Rotifers, the tiny animals that along with other small creatures and plant matter, make up plankton, can live just about anywhere you find standing Rotifers are the smallest animals ON EARTH: it doesn't get much cooler than that!. — “Episode 3”, sciences.unlv.edu
  • Rotifers are the most abundant macro invertebrates found in the activated sludge process that are metazoa in the phylum Rotifera. The mouth opening of the rotifer is surrounded by two bands of cilia. — “Lesson 7: Metazoa”, water.me.vccs.edu
  • Rotifers as model organisms and as study objects in their own right Rotifers are microscopically small animals that live in freshwater, brackish water and other moist environments such as mosses. — “Dr. Gregor Fussmann - Rotifers”, biology.mcgill.ca
  • Rotifers : the "wheel animalcules" Rotifers are microscopic aquatic animals of the phylum The oldest reported fossil rotifers have been found in Dominican amber dating to the. — “Introduction to the Rotifera”, ucmp.berkeley.edu
  • Production and application of rotifers in aquaculture. — “Rotifers Rotifer Culture”,

Images

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  • yes they were red~
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  • Rotifer and egg she couldn t seem to shake the egg loose Rotifer of a different type A closeup of the same one A graceful swimmer with what look like extra tail fins
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  • Rotifers Philodina roseola jpg
  • Photo taken at 100x bright field Photo taken at 400x bright field After addition of MicroSolv 118 and Micronutrients
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  • Here is my setup for raising the fry any grow out Top shelf phytoplankton brine shrimp and grow out tank holding oldest clowns Middle shelf larval and grow out tanks tank on the right is blacked out for new born fry Bottom shelf
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  • Filinia longiseta
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  • during the summers of 1993 and 1994 The diagram shows the percent biomass of the rotifers relative to the other zooplankton observed at each site Lougheed and Chow Fraser in press Rotifers compose a substantial amount of the zooplankton observed at each site Given their small size relative to the other species they are much more abundant than the large bodied
  • A bdelloid hanging by its tail from some algae Another bdelloid type rotifer this one with an unusually long tail A bdelloid hiding in the weeds Lepadella probably Brightfield
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  • Euchlanis sp
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  • Brachionus
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  • Under stressed conditions rotifers form cysts
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Videos

  • Live Rotifers by Dr.G's Live Rotifers, Live Rotifer Culture, Dr.G's Marine Aquaculture, Live Copepods, Rotifers, Live Phytoplankton
  • Rotifers from the bird bath Rotifers and protists from the birdbath in the yard ..These have a little horn form on their heads..The identifying characteristic of them is the corona, the two ciliated disks arounding their mouths. They have an almost complete set of organs, a pair of jaws (the trophi), a brain, a dorsal antenna, a stomach and toes on the tail. This species, and many others, even has a pair of eyes that are visible as orange specks above its brain on the back of its head. why such a tiny animal would need binocular vision and what it can actually see are, of course, open to observation ... speculate!
  • Rotifer Feeding. Rotifer Feeding. A cell is caught in the vortex created by the movement of the animals cilia.
  • Live feed"Rotifer" used for larvae of Ikan ketutu or Marble Goby Marble goby breeding and farming-.my
  • Bdelloid Rotifer Video with Canon T1i On Amscope Microscope Part 1 Video of Bdelloid Rotifers. I collected these from some moss that I soaked in water in a Petri dish. Moss and soil seem to be very rich in microscopic life.
  • Rotifer Cloning Rotifers are tiny zooplankton (~250 microns, four times the diameter of human hair) that eat algae and in turn feed fish larvae, so they are vital to our ecology. Look at the Rotifer inside the "O". It has an egg sac attached to it's body and will rotate counterclockwise then clockwise, finally tearing the egg sac off it's body! These fascinating animals reproduce by cloning (parthenogenesis), giving birth only to females unless they are stressed, then they also give birth to males that can't eat, they are just there to fertilize eggs that can survive drying for up to 100 years.
  • Bdelloid rotifers in activated sludge A clip by Zika Reh from Subotica Wastewater Treatment Plant activated sludge - www.reh.in.rs
  • Rotifers (Phylodina) A newly maturing closed system for ornamental fish produced a HUGE bloom of these rotifers. Later on as the system fully matured, their populations decreased, leveled off and is maintained.
  • rotifer ingesting filamentous bacteria in activated sludge.m1v Video clip shows a rotifer Lecane inermis ingesting filamentous bacteria in the activated sludge sample. Potential of rotifers to control bulking in wastewater treatment plants was described in details in paper entitled: The role of Lecane rotifers in activated sludge bulking control. Edyta Fiałkowska and Agnieszka Pajdak-Stós, Water Research, 42(10-11):2483-2490, 2008
  • Rotifera: A visual celebration of the smallest animals Rotifera are tiny multicellular animals that are an amazingly important part of the food chain in most aquatic environments. They are the stepping stone in that food chain between bacteria and tiny algae particles and larger creatures, like insect larvae or filter feeders like ducks. Even being so small, they have eyes, a complete digestive system, and even a brain consisting of fif*** cells. Without these amazingly tiny wonders, the ecology webs of the world would collapse.
  • About Rotifers visit - Want to learn about rotifers? Watch our about LIVE Rotifers video. Visit us at
  • Protista - Stentor in Rotifer Colony this was originally a culture dish of stentors, but rotifers took it over.. see the result shot by: Esther Jang random comments by: Diana Lee and maybe Terry SeeToe? produced by Hunter College High School students
  • Mk-19 with Mk-Ranger aiming system Infrared aiming system (Mk-Ranger) used on the Mk-19 full-auto grenade launcher. This allows vary good accuracy for what was previously a very inaccurate weapon. The Mk-Ranger system is built by BE Meyers, and uses two IZLID type IR lasers (one for pointing and one for flood).
  • ZM Copepods Rotifers River Shrimp mixed culture Mixed culture of rotifers, copepods, and young river shrimp at approx 9mm. This was an accidental mix but instead of being reared on BBS the shrimp have grown really well on the young copepods.
  • The Happy Rotifer A rotifer happily devours its neighbors.
  • Our Freshwater Microverse : Rotifers [1] A free-swiming Rotifer from the phylum Rotifera. Rotifers are small, multi-celled animals that obtain food using a set of cilia (or "hairs"). The cilia rapidly beat in an orginized manner forming a powerful circulation of water and food (bacteria, protists) towards their mouth. In this video, it almost appears as if these discs are rotating, and when first observed under the microscope these animals were called "wheel animalcules". Sample collected from wetland area in SW Michigan. Scale: 20 microns.
  • Bdelloid Rotifers Recorded with Canon T1i Bdelloid Rotifers recorded at approximately 100x on an Amscope Model T-490B Trinocular scope with a Canon T1i mounted on the trinocular port and tethered to a PC using EOS Utility to record. You can clearly see the rotary organs on the head here, [they don't really roatate, it's an optical illusion]. The Mastax is also clearly visdible, which is an organ equivilant to chompers, or your own teeth. These organs have been found in 100 million year old amber, the only prehistoric microbe parts ever found, other than testate amoeba shells and pollen. Canon provides free software to shoot tethered to PC or Mac computers, using a supplied USB cord. It actually works quite well for stills and video. When using the camera with an AF lens, you can even focus using the buttons on the EOS Utility panel. When mounted on a microscope, focus is done with the microscope knobs. The T1i is the 5th camera I have used, in search of something that would take good quality video and so far, it has done the best job. I have also used a Canon 1DMkIII for still, which did OK, but has the problem of blur from the shutter caused shake. I have used two Tucsen USB tube cameras, a 10Mp and a 5Mp. I would never recommend these cameras to anyone. They are pure junk and so is the software that comes with them. The last camera I tried was a CCD Sony surveillance type camera that actually did quite well, but you need to have a TV IN card on your computer to connect and record to. While I freely admit to ...
  • Rotifers! Rotifers taken from the water of my Algae open photobioreactor.
  • Our Freshwater Microverse: Rotifers [2] This Rotifer (Monostyla lunaris) is seen foraging along the cells of some green algae. Notice how the Rotifer's "tail" has damaged the algae cell it is attached to. Collected in freshwater sample from a wetland in Southeast Michigan. Real time video rate. Scale: 20 microns. HD format.
  • Bdelloid Rotifer Video with Canon T1i On Amscope Microscope Part 2 Video of Bdelloid Rotifers. I collected these from some moss that I soaked in water in a Petri dish. Moss and soil seem to be very rich in microscopic life.
  • Three Species Of Rotifer I have not been able to identify any of these yet. This is the first time I have seen any rotifers with the two long toes, other than in images or videos. The sample came from my 3 gallon glass candy jar that I use for an aquarium. I started it a couple weeks ago, as an attempt to keep some samples alive through the winter. So far it is working well, producing an unending supply of microscopic subjects. The best of which are found chomping on some Tetramin flake food I put in the tank periodically as treats for the snails. These rotifers were attached to some older flakes that were near the surface. Watch closely at about 4:20 in the video, as the rotifer snatches a microbe swimming by and gobbles him down. By the way, I am looking for a Nikon Fluophot Phase Contrast Condenser. If you have one for sale, or know of one, please contact me.
  • Brachionus Calyciflorus male rotifers harassing a female we shot this video in our lab using a camera fixed on our inverted microscope. It illustrates the behavior of male rotifers around a female rotifer. The males are the smaller organisms moving faster. The female is the larger organism moving slower
  • (red) Rotifer feeding I got some water from a bird bath and looked at it under my microscope. There were tons of these rotifers in it, but what I'd like to know is why are mine red when the other ones I saw on youtube were clear. This is a video of a rotifer feeding, the two protruding parts at the front are how it feeds, the cillia scrape in bacteria and other food like a vacuum cleaner. This was taken at 100x magnification.
  • Rotifer Rotifer in action
  • The Rotifer's lunch Dispite their small dimensions, Rotifers are multicelled animals. Rotifers, whose name in latin means "wheel-bearer", have a crown of cilia around the mouth that they use to make a water circulation. The Video shows a rotifer (Philodina sp. ?) while feeding. Thanks to the microscope technique called dark field, it's possible to see the particles of organic matter moving toward the mouth of the organism. Food is then passed into the "mastax", a structure to grind the food. Rotifers are omnivorous; their diet most commonly consists of dead or decomposing organic materials, as well as unicellular algae.
  • Rotifer eating green algae Scenedesmus dimorphus Rotifers eating a microalgae
  • Rotifers Several Philodina rotifers swimming about & feeding
  • rotifers & copepods Culturing rotifers & copepods
  • Rotifers A pair of rotifers and some haematococcus from my rain gauge. www.vk2
  • Marble Goby breeding and farming-live feed for marble goby larvae(production of rotifers) Rotifer is the live feed for 2nd day until 12th day-old larvae of marble goby .High mortality would encounter if no rotifer is fed to the marble goby larvae from 2nd day onward .
  • Rotifer Rotifera Fossil range: Eocene - Recent Rotaria Rotaria Scientific classification Domain: Eukarya Kingdom: Animalia Subkingdom: Eumetazoa Superphylum: Platyzoa Phylum: Rotifera Cuvier, 1798 Classes Monogononta Digononta Seisonidea The rotifers, or rotifaers, make up a phylum of microscopic and near-microscopic pseudocoelomate animals. They were first described by Rev. John Harris in 1696 and other forms were described by Anton van Leeuwenhoek in 1703.[1] Most rotifers are around 0.1-0.5 mm long (although their size can range from 50μm to over 2 millimeters) [2], and are common in freshwater environments throughout the world with a few sal***er species. Some rotifers are free swimming and truly planktonic, others move by inchworming along the substrate, and some are sessile, living inside tubes or gelatinous holdfasts that are attached to a substrate. About 25 species are colonial (eg, Sinantherina semibullata), either sessile or planktonic. Rotifers play an important part of the freshwater zooplankton, being a major foodsource and with many species also contributing to decompositioning of soil. See images of the Rotifer on our Flickr pages
  • Rotifer Eggs and their Movement Several interesting things in one video. At the bottom right are a bunch of rotifer eggs. The one near the centre of the screen looks like it's almost ready to hatch. Looking at the two rotifers at the upper left, you can see how they 'irritate' each other and how one uses its 'feet' to move around.
  • More Rotifers Living The Good Life I love watching these guys with their spinning heads. They are a beneficial microbe that helps clean the environment of bad cells. When they move, they remind me of an inchworm, and who doesn't like inchworms? If you are looking for Rotifers to view with your microscope, find some moss on an old dead tree or stump and put some in a covered dish with enough water to almost cover it. Let it site for a few days, and if you keep it wet, you can keep using it as a self generating sample. Use an eyedropper of pipette to get a couple drops of water, right from the moss. Push it down into the moss and suck up water through the moss to get all the good stuff. You should find lot's of Rotifers and Nematodes and who knows, a tardigrade or two. Microscope: Nikon Fluophot Flourescence Research Microscope Camera: Canon T1i w/ EOS to 23mm adaptor w/Nikon 10x Projector lens Scope Settings: 15.1 MP Canon 1.6x Camera over 10x Objective
  • rotifers under microscope at 40x As far as I know, these are the Brachionus plicatilis ("L" type) of rotifers.
  • Philodina Rotifers and Vorticella Photos and video of both rotifers and vorticella
  • Rotifers in the Mist I spent one afternoon chasing microscopic organisms through depths of fields like some Stanley Kubrick of the really small world. Rotifers remind me of the Sandworms of Dune: a set of huge jaws the size of their own body. Thing of nightmares.
  • Rotifers from the bird bath with closeup SEM Rotifers close up from the bird bath
  • Death of a Rotifer When I don't play banjo, I try to make time for a little microscopy. Actually, this little Philodina could live for another decade in this dessicated state. Don't be scared, these little guys are really little animals with specialized cells....about 1000 of them. Rotifers can be found in lakes, mud puddles, moist soil, mushrooms and tree trunks. Just another unsung link in the food chain. This was captured at 600X magnification and shot with a Nikon S2 on macro function. ,,,,,,enjoy!
  • Rotifers vs. Fungus The parasitic fungus Rotiferopthera angustispora attacks Bdelloid rotifers.
  • Rotifers under microscope L-strain Rotifers under 4x and 10x Magnification.