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quadratically

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  • Double-Cylindrical PointFocus 3 kmr.nada.kth.se The parabola has the well-known property of reflecting axis-parallel rays to a point If we rotate the parabola around its axis, we create a parabolic disc, which has the well-known property of reflecting parallel rays (= planar wave-fronts) that are incident along the axis direction of the disc to a point. An animation that shows this process is available at We can avoid the "astronomical costs" associated with creating (= casting) a large parabolic disc, and harness the workpower of the sun by bending two flat mirror sheets in the shape of parabolic cylinders to create an exact point focus. This is due to the Double Cylindrical Point Focus principle: If the focal line of the first cylinder is identical to the generating line of the parabola that is the intersection of the second cylinder with a plane perpendicular to its axis, then the incoming rays will be reflected to a perfect point. For a proof of the DCPF principle, see and for an animation see The DCPF principle was discovered on November 16, 1976 by Ambjörn Naeve Besides being easier than the ordinary parabolic disc to build in large sizes (avoiding "astronomical costs"), the DCPF has the advantage that the focal point can be placed outside of the solar influx area, where it is freely available to do work. See The DCPF also has the advantage that the number of planar approximator strips of fixed width grows LINEARLY with the ...
  • The first breeder in Conway's Game of Life The first-ever constructed breeder (pattern that grows quadratically) in Conway's Game of Life. Here it evolves for four thousand generations, creating approximately 4500 gliders ( ).
  • Double-Cylindrical PointFocus 1 kmr.nada.kth.se The parabola has the well-known property of reflecting axis-parallel rays to a point If we rotate the parabola around its axis, we create a parabolic disc, which has the well-known property of reflecting parallel rays (= planar wave-fronts) that are incident along the axis direction of the disc to a point. An animation that shows this process is available at We can avoid the "astronomical costs" associated with creating (= casting) a large parabolic disc, and harness the workpower of the sun by bending two flat mirror sheets in the shape of parabolic cylinders to create an exact point focus. This is due to the Double Cylindrical Point Focus principle: If the focal line of the first cylinder is identical to the generating line of the parabola that is the intersection of the second cylinder with a plane perpendicular to its axis, then the incoming rays will be reflected to a perfect point. For a proof of the DCPF principle, see and for an animation see The DCPF principle was discovered on November 16, 1976 by Ambjörn Naeve and is demonstrated in this video by Tomas Elofsson, Gusum, Sweden, in July 1989. Besides being easier than the ordinary parabolic disc to build in large sizes (avoiding "astronomical costs"), the DCPF has the advantage that the focal point can be placed outside of the solar influx area, where it is freely available to do work. See The DCPF also has the advantage that ...
  • Double-Cylindrical PointFocus 4 kmr.nada.kth.se The parabola has the well-known property of reflecting axis-parallel rays to a point If we rotate the parabola around its axis, we create a parabolic disc, which has the well-known property of reflecting parallel rays (= planar wave-fronts) that are incident along the axis direction of the disc to a point. An animation that shows this process is available at We can avoid the "astronomical costs" associated with creating (= casting) a large parabolic disc, and harness the workpower of the sun by bending two flat mirror sheets in the shape of parabolic cylinders to create an exact point focus. This is due to the Double Cylindrical Point Focus principle: If the focal line of the first cylinder is identical to the generating line of the parabola that is the intersection of the second cylinder with a plane perpendicular to its axis, then the incoming rays will be reflected to a perfect point. For a proof of the DCPF principle, see and for an animation see The DCPF principle was discovered on November 16, 1976 by Ambjörn Naeve Besides being easier than the ordinary parabolic disc to build in large sizes (avoiding "astronomical costs"), the DCPF has the advantage that the focal point can be placed outside of the solar influx area, where it is freely available to do work. See The DCPF also has the advantage that the number of planar approximator strips of fixed width grows LINEARLY with the ...
  • Lec 32 | MIT 5.60 Thermodynamics & Kinetics, Spring 2008 Lecture 32: Steady-state and equilibrium approximations. View the complete course at: ocw.mit.edu License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at ocw.mit.edu More courses at ocw.mit.edu
  • Double-Cylindrical PointFocus - animation kmr.nada.kth.se The parabola has the well-known property of reflecting axis-parallel rays to a point If we rotate the parabola around its axis, we create a parabolic disc, which has the well-known property of reflecting parallel rays (= planar wave-fronts) that are incident along the axis direction of the disc to a point. An animation that shows this process is available at We can avoid the "astronomical costs" associated with creating (= casting) an ordinary parabolic disc, and harness the workpower of the sun by bending two flat mirror sheets in the shape of parabolic cylinders to create an exact point focus. This is due to the Double Cylindrical Point Focus principle: If the focal line of the first cylinder is identical to the generating line of the parabola that is the intersection of the second cylinder with a plane perpendicular to its axis, then the incoming rays will be reflected to a perfect point. For a proof of the DCPF principle, see The DCPF principle was discovered on November 16, 1976 by Ambjörn Naeve The video shows an animation (created with the Graphing Calculator ) of a planar wavefront being reshaped into a spherical wavefront by reflection in two parabolic cylinders configured according to the DCPF principle. Besides being easier than the ordinary parabolic disc to build in large sizes (avoiding "astronomical costs"), the DCPF also has the advantage that the focal point can be placed ...
  • KTP second harmonic.avi KTP nonlinear material conversion from 1064 nm to 532 nm with phase matching 2 crystal the angle is 24,3 degres. The conversion efficiency is proportional to the power density of the fundamental beam (1064 nm), whereas the harmonic power itself is quadratically proportional to the fundamental power. At pump intensity of 50MW/cm2 the doubling efficiency is 20% , at 100 MW/cm2 is 60% and at 200 MW/cm2 is 80% the maximum possible.
  • Parabolic sawtooth (Conway's Game of Life) A sawtooth that returns to its original population in amounts of time that grow quadratically, shown here evolving for 250000 generations.
  • Double-Cylindrical PointFocus 2 kmr.nada.kth.se The parabola has the well-known property of reflecting axis-parallel rays to a point If we rotate the parabola around its axis, we create a parabolic disc, which has the well-known property of reflecting parallel rays (= planar wave-fronts) that are incident along the axis direction of the disc to a point. An animation that shows this process is available at We can avoid the "astronomical costs" associated with creating (= casting) a large parabolic disc, and harness the workpower of the sun by bending two flat mirror sheets in the shape of parabolic cylinders to create an exact point focus. This is due to the Double Cylindrical Point Focus principle: If the focal line of the first cylinder is identical to the generating line of the parabola that is the intersection of the second cylinder with a plane perpendicular to its axis, then the incoming rays will be reflected to a perfect point. For a proof of the DCPF principle, see and for an animation see The DCPF principle was discovered on November 16, 1976 by Ambjörn Naeve and is demonstrated in this video by Tomas Elofsson, Gusum, Sweden, in July 1989. Besides being easier than the ordinary parabolic disc to build in large sizes (avoiding "astronomical costs"), the DCPF has the advantage that the focal point can be placed outside of the solar influx area, where it is freely available to do work. See The DCPF also has the advantage that ...
  • Pokémon Stadium - Prime Cup Poké Ball (with Poké Cup team) Prime Cup Poké Ball is pretty easy. Especially in round 1. How easy is it? Well, I've picked out a fairly solid set of 6, which can romp through the cup without a care in the world...and then taken away half their levels (okay, two of them proceed to get 5 levels back), because this is a team I normally use in Poké Cup. The way the damage formula is constructed, head-to-head power actually scales quadratically with level. So with all other things equal, a level 100 is about 4 times as powerful as a level 50 of the same species. So we have bad, high-level Pokémon against good, much lower-level Pokémon...which one rules the day? (Some of the uninitiated among you may notice one move--Gengar's Ice Punch--appears in pink on the move select, and so does the player name in any battle where I picked Gengar. This is because Stadium looks for moves that it doesn't think should be there, but of course it was unable to look into the future and see that Gengar could use TM33 from GSC. Fortunately it doesn't make the moves inaccessible, probably for precisely that reason; it just colors them pink as a warning.)
  • Double-Cylindrical PointFocus 5 kmr.nada.kth.se The parabola has the well-known property of reflecting axis-parallel rays to a point If we rotate the parabola around its axis, we create a parabolic disc, which has the well-known property of reflecting parallel rays (= planar wave-fronts) that are incident along the axis direction of the disc to a point. An animation that shows this process is available at We can avoid the "astronomical costs" associated with creating (= casting) a large parabolic disc, and harness the workpower of the sun by bending two flat mirror sheets in the shape of parabolic cylinders to create an exact point focus. This is due to the Double Cylindrical Point Focus principle: If the focal line of the first cylinder is identical to the generating line of the parabola that is the intersection of the second cylinder with a plane perpendicular to its axis, then the incoming rays will be reflected to a perfect point. For a proof of the DCPF principle, see and for an animation see The DCPF principle was discovered on November 16, 1976 by Ambjörn Naeve Besides being easier than the ordinary parabolic disc to build in large sizes (avoiding "astronomical costs"), the DCPF has the advantage that the focal point can be placed outside of the solar influx area, where it is freely available to do work. See The DCPF also has the advantage that the number of planar approximator strips of fixed width grows LINEARLY with the ...