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pathobiology

Examples

  • The Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University fosters excellence The main areas of research in the department include microbiology and immunology, neurobiology, pathobiology, toxicology, and cancer biology. — “Pathobiology & Diagnostic Investigation - Michigan State”, pathobiology.msu.edu
  • DESCRIPTION OF PATHOBIOLOGY. Pathobiology of infectious and non-infectious animal diseases investigates the relationship between harmful factors and the animal; in particular it is interested in the way of influencing health or disease in a shared context of factor, environment and animal. — “Pathobiology”,
  • To understand the nature of disease and its impact on humans and animals, the School's Department of Pathobiology is dedicated to research in pathology, infectious diseases and immunology. By identifying genes that cause disease, Pathobiology faculty contribute to the diagnosis, treatment and. — “Pathobiology”, vet.upenn.edu
  • The NYU Pathobiology graduate program offers a foundation of basic medical concepts for PhD students and provides a biological perspective to basic and translational research topics. — “NYU Department of Pathology | Pathobiology Graduate Training”, pathology.med.nyu.edu
  • The Pathobiology graduate program offers graduate training in the application of basic biomedical research to diseases of public health interest. The Pathobiology program does not admit international applicants who have a TOEFL score of less than 600 on the paper-based test. — “Pathobiology”, washington.edu
  • Pathobiology. Mission Statement. To provide state-of-the-art education in anatomic and clinical pathology to veterinary students and pathology residents, to provide timely and high quality diagnostic support to the College's small animal and large. — “Pathobiology”, vet.utk.edu
  • The Pathobiology Graduate Program is a good match for students seeking graduate training in microbiology (bacteriology, virology, parasitology), immunology, and/or pathology. The Pathobiology Graduate Program is administered by the Graduate Program Committee and. — “Pathobiology”, microvet.arizona.edu
  • Definition of pathobiology in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of pathobiology. Pronunciation of pathobiology. Translations of pathobiology. pathobiology synonyms, pathobiology antonyms. Information about pathobiology in the free online English. — “pathobiology - definition of pathobiology by the Free Online”,
  • te professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology at Kansas State University. The Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation in the. — “Pathobiology | ”,
  • Definition of pathobiology from Webster's New World College Dictionary. Meaning of pathobiology. Pronunciation of pathobiology. Definition of the word pathobiology. Origin of the word pathobiology. — “pathobiology - Definition of pathobiology at ”,
  • For other uses, see Pathologist (disambiguation). A renal cell carcinoma (chromophobe Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. — “Pathology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • pathobiology (uncountable) (biology) The branch of biology that deals with pathology with greater emphasis on the biological than Retrieved from "http:///wiki/pathobiology". — “pathobiology - Wiktionary”,
  • Definition of pathobiology in the Medical Dictionary. pathobiology explanation. Information about pathobiology in Free online English dictionary. What is pathobiology? Meaning of pathobiology medical term. What does pathobiology mean?. — “pathobiology - definition of pathobiology in the Medical”, medical-
  • Pathobiology and Molecular Medicine graduate program at the University of Cincinnati. — “Pathobiology & Molecular Medicine”, pathobiology.uc.edu
  • The Department of Pathobiology is actively engaged in research, teaching, and outreach within the College of Veterinary Medicine. The Department of Pathobiology is the academic home for 26 graduate students and residents (19 PhD-level) in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program. — “College of Veterinary Medicine - Pathobiology”, vetmed.auburn.edu
  • Students in the graduate program in Pathobiology and Molecular Medicine are eligible to Programs in Health and Disease, including the Pathobiology and Molecular Medicine program. — “Graduate Doctoral Programs | Education | Department of”, pathology.columbia.edu
  • Welcome to the Department of Pathobiology and Veterinary Science. We are the center for veterinary science on the Storrs Campus and as our duty, we are responsible for teaching, research, and extension programs concerned with infectious, metabolic,. — “Department of Pathobiology and Veterinary Science | UConn”, pathobiology.uconn.edu
  • Pathobiology researchers serve the national and the global community by dedication to the solution of problems in human health through discovery, application, and education. The Department of Pathobiology is home to a multi-disciplinary team. — “Department of Pathobiology”,
  • pathology n. , pl. , -gies . The scientific study of the nature of disease and its causes, processes, development, and consequences Also called pathobiology. The anatomic or functional manifestations of a disease: the pathology of cancer. A departure or deviation from a normal condition:. — “pathology: Definition from ”,
  • Karger is a medical publisher, scientific publisher and biomedical publisher of print and online journals and books. Also available: Pathology and Immunopathology Research Vol. 1-8 (1983-1989), before the journal's integration 1990 in Pathobiology. — “Pathobiology - Journal Home”,
  • Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine is a major veterinary educational, medical and research institution located in College Station, Texas. The Department of Veterinary Pathobiology ("VTPB") at Texas A&M University is one of the largest and most active in the country. — “Veterinary Pathobiology - Texas A&M Veterinary Medicine”, vtpb-www.cvm.tamu.edu

Videos

  • Lab biosafety Kansas State University's Mylissia Stukey, research associate in diagnostic medicine and pathobiology, is a biosafety officer and discusses this role. She explains the differences in the levels of biosafety facilities and the importance of biosafety in laboratories.
  • Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto Investigate Disease. Impact Health. www.lmp.utoronto.ca To experience the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology (LMP) is to experience a world of boundless opportunity. Opportunity to interact with preeminent experts in state-of-the-art facilities. Opportunity to challenge the current dogma in research and clinical practice. Opportunity to investigate the causes and mechanisms of disease and to impact health. LMP occupies a special place at the interface between basic biomedical science and clinical practice. The interactions between these spheres provide an incredible opportunity to translate new knowledge into improved health outcomes for patients and populations. As part of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, we offer unparalleled access to - More than 350 expert faculty including basic scientists, pathologists, laboratory physicians and scientists. - Outstanding case material. - A stunning array of research opportunities. - Diverse training sites. - Engaging student-run organizations. - One of North America's largest and most ethnically diverse cities.
  • Evolution, Random or Non-Random? Podcasts of Dr. Zachary Moore discussing particular topics within Evolutionary Biology. Education • 2005. Doctor of Philosophy in Pathobiology and Molecular Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Ohio • 2001. Bachelor of Science in Biology, University of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Texas A&M 2011 Freshman Convocation - Dr. Ian Tizard Dr. Ian Tizard, Richard M. Schubot Professor of Exotic Bird Health in the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM), served as the keynote speaker for the 2011 Freshman Convocation on August 28, 2011 at 2:30 pm in Reed Arena.
  • James Gillespie: Finding the Cure for Cancer James describes his life in the Pathobiology lab while he helps cure cancer at Auburn University
  • QPX Research on Clams (Fall 2007) NYSG Research: In Fall 2007, New York Sea Grant's Barbara A. Branca visited the Marine Animal Disease Laboratory at Stony Brook University to talk with researchers about their extensive QPX monitoring program in Raritan Bay, Peconic Bay and other areas of the marine district to determine the extent and distribution of QPX disease. QPX disease had caused mortalities in both cultured and wild populations of Mercenaria mercenaria, or hard clams, in the northeast in the 1990s. As its moniker suggests, little was known about this pathogen, a protistan parasite. A recent New York Sea Grant-funded study partially supported by NYSDEC, which has provided insight into the pathobiology of this parasite, may lay the groundwork for restoring the hard clam to health, as well as the industry itself.
  • What is NOT Evolution? Podcasts of Dr. Zachary Moore discussing particular topics within Evolutionary Biology. Education • 2005. Doctor of Philosophy in Pathobiology and Molecular Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Ohio • 2001. Bachelor of Science in Biology, University of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Diverse Research for a Diverse Population - University of Toronto As the only medical school serving the Toronto metro area, a region of over five-million people, the University of Toronto Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology has unparalleled access to a diverse patient population and interesting disease case-studies. Follow USCAP-TV as we find out how the university's emphasis on research allows it to generate new knowledge about disease and push personalized medicine forward. The expressed opinions, informational content and links displayed on USCAP-TV do not necessarily reflect a position or policy of the US & Canadian Academy of Pathology. No official endorsement by the Academy of the viewpoints expressed on USCAP-TV should be inferred.
  • The Role of Oxidative Stress and AAA Pathobiology (September 4, 2008) Neal Weintraub, MD, discusses his research on oxidative stress locally increased in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Disease and the possibility that Taurine might be a safe mode of therapy for humans. 2008 Stanford AAA Summit vascular.stanford.edu Stanford School of Medicine med.stanford.edu Stanford Channel on YouTube:
  • Tissue Fibrosis — Killer Number One in the Western World - Part 1 Clinical Demystifying Medicine Seminar Series Date: Monday, March 26, 2012 Location: McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamitlon, Ontario, Canada Speakers: Dr. Martin Kolb, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine Dr. Jack Gauldie, University Professor, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine Description: This seminar includes a clinical presentation with patient interview followed by a research presentation. Outline the general concept of healing, scar formation and fibrosis. Understand the clinical presentation of debilitating lung fibrosis and how it worsens over time. Review the pathobiology underlying lung fibrosis. Understand how these pathogenetic concepts are translated into drug development.
  • T Cells Hunt Like Sharks in Our Body: Penn Study A cross-disciplinary team at the University of Pennsylvania has arrived at a surprising finding: T cells, a key part of the immune system, use a movement strategy to track down parasites that is similar to strategies that predators such as monkeys, sharks and blue-fin tuna use to hunt their prey. The research, published in the journal Nature, involved a unique collaboration between the laboratories of senior authors Christopher Hunter, professor and chair of the Pathobiology Department in Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine, and Andrea Liu, the Hepburn Professor of Physics in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Penn Vet postdoctoral researcher Tajie Harris and physics graduate student Edward Banigan also played leading roles in the research. The study, published in the journal Nature, was conducted in mice infected with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Using a refine yet powerful microscope that can display living tissues in three dimensions in real time, the researchers tracked the movements of T cells. Contrary to their expectations, the T cells did not move directly toward the parasite. But their movements were not entirely random, either. Instead, their paths tended to have many short "steps" and occasional long "runs," with long and short pauses in between. T cells aren't the only ones that move this way to find their targets. This strategy —many short-distance movements interspersed with occasional longer-distance moves — seems particularly common among hunting ...
  • U of T Scarborough (UTSC): Human Biology UTSC's Human Biology program provides a solid foundation of introductory science courses and core biology courses while emphasizing issues related to human health and the interaction of the human species with the environment. The first year of the program emphasizes introductory courses in biology, chemistry, calculus, physics and psychology. The second year of the program emphasizes core courses in cell biology, molecular biology, physiology, ecology, evolution and anatomy that provide the basis for continued specialization in the third and fourth years. The upper years of the program emphasize specialized courses in biochemistry, endocrinology, microbiology, histology, toxicology, physiology, psychology, pathology and pathobiology. This program is suited for those students who wish to go onto health-related fields such as medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, physiotherapy, public health and health policy / management or graduate studies in these, and other areas such as physiology, molecular medicine and endocrinology.
  • Osteoporosis: Bouncing babies to crumbling wrinklies (20 Oct 2011) UCL Lunch Hour Lecture: Osteoporosis: Bouncing babies to crumbling wrinklies - the need to own our bones Professor Allen Goodship (UCL Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science) The skeleton is key to our ability to undertake everyday movements and activities related to well-being and high quality independent living. The general perception of bone is that of a museum specimen -- a dry inert structure. This is far from correct; our skeleton is a dynamic and responsive organ. The material properties and structural architecture are conditioned by both genetics and our changing functional demands throughout life. The devastating degenerative conditions such as osteoporosis (in both women and men!) and associated fragility fractures represent a time bomb for society and healthcare requirements in our ageing population. Through an understanding of the pathobiology of bone and the skeleton we can develop strategies to mitigate the risk of these conditions and thus prolong an active and independent life in old age. This lecture marked World Osteoporosis Day on 20 Oct
  • 3M Health Care: Medical Drapes Discover the benefits of Surgical Drapes from 3M and see for yourself how the 3M™ Steri--Drape™ Fabric is absorbent and impervious to fluid strikethrough, which helps to reduce bacterial transfer and prevents contamination of the surgical site.* *Pathobiology of Inf. In prosthetic devices. Steve H Dougherty. Review of Infectious Diseases Vol 10, No 6, November 1988
  • Dependence SYNOPSIS Dependence juxtaposes scenes of a veterinary post-mortem with a portrait of an elderly woman whose dog named Trixie has recently died. The film conveys the idea of zoonosis and the One Health Concept. COLLABORATION This project was a collaboration with Prof Sean Callanan at the UCD Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research and and Post-Mortem Room Technician Brian Cloak at the Veterinary Pathology Department at UCD. Their research revolves around pathobiology and Infectious in animals. Recently these UCD scientists made a breakthrough studying diseases spread by red squirrels in Ireland. They have also been researching a link between nervous centre defects in purebred greyhounds and similar defects being found in a closely-knit tribe in Siberia.
  • Prospects for Vitamin D Nutrition (4 of 5) Reinhold Vieth PhD - Vitamin D Lecture 2005 Professor Departments of Nutritional Sciences, Laboratory Medicine, and Pathobiology University of Toronto Director, Bone and Mineral Laboratory Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Mount Sinai Hospital
  • SemexImmunity+.mp4 All dairy producers want more healthy cows. The challenge has been that until now, health traits have been very difficult to improve genetically. For over a decade, Semex has been supporting immune response research at the University of Guelph in Canada under the direction of Dr. Bonnie Mallard, BSc (Agr), MSc, PhD, Professor Immunogenetics, Department of Pathobiology. This research has resulted in a new product at Semex known as Immunity+™ sires.
  • How to use an aquarium gravel siphon without getting a mouthful 1. With a thumb over the end of the tube and altering the seal between your thumb and the tube, fill the hose and tube with water by scooping water with the wide end on one hand and altering the thumb seal with the other. 2. Then put the free end at a lower level and into a drain or bucket to catch the waste water. 3. Move the wide end along the bottom of your tank to vacuum the gravel. -- Now on: Twitter - - Facebook - Linkedin - -- Yours sincerely, Dr Richmond Loh BSc BVMS MPhil (*Vet Path*) MANZCVSc (*Aquatics* & *Pathobiology*) DipPM CMAVA Veterinarian / Adjunct Lecturer Murdoch University *The Fish Vet*, Perth, Western Australia. *Mobile Veterinary Service for fish and other aquatic creatures.* .au Ph +61 (0)421 822 383
  • Update on the Pathobiology and Treatment of Sarcoidosis - David Moller, MD
  • Prospects for Vitamin D Nutrition (3 of 5) Reinhold Vieth PhD - Vitamin D Lecture 2005 Professor Departments of Nutritional Sciences, Laboratory Medicine, and Pathobiology University of Toronto Director, Bone and Mineral Laboratory Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Mount Sinai Hospital
  • MACAWS in SlowMotion! Rainforest Research! *** Every Day 60 This is a REAL PLACE... and this happens EVERY MORNING!! I went there two mornings and made observations. It was amazing. Please Click to Tweet! bit.ly I apologize for the video being a couple of minutes longer... but it took months of planning and preparation to do this. I wanted to leave a bit in there about the boat so I wouldn't lose the memories! The noise was awful though (Macaws have a horrible song). I didn't know most of the rain in the Amazon comes from the Atlantic! So this is what happens when you combine a battery operated Miro LC320S high speed camera with an incredibly specific spot of dirt that Macaws LOVE. It took several days and lots of modes of transportation to get there, but we took a new MIRO ( to one of the most remote research facilities in the Peruvian Rainforest. The footage we obtained was incredible. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ How to get there yourself!: I coordinated the travel with Rainforest Expeditions Tell them Destin sent you. You can checkout what they do on their Facebook page: /Rainforest.Expeditions They ran me up and down the river in a boat, gave me lenses, a clean bed, awesome food etc. It was pretty amazing! See the research project's website here: The project is led by Dr. Don Brightsmith Schubot Exotic Bird Health Center Department of Veterinary Pathobiology College of Veterinary Medicine Jeff Cremer was my hook-up for all things photography once I got ...
  • FWC's Marine Mammal Pathobiology Laboratory Introduction to the FWC's Marine Mammal Pathobiology Lab. Showcasing Marine Mammal strandings, rescues, health assessments and releases.
  • A Friendship Made For Kansas State A decades-long mentorship is helping two Kansas State University professors improve American and Chinese animal health. Related article: www.k-state.edu
  • Chimps Our closest genetic relatives are in danger once again. Virginia Tech professor of biomedical sciences and pathobiology Taranjit Kaur says the chimps of Tanzania are suffering at the hands of a strain of human respiratory disease. This time, the blame lies with a growing number of eco-tourists and field researchers. With her own family in tow, discover Kaurs impetus to live and learn in the malaria-ridden jungle, housed in a portable solar-powered laboratory, with the very mammals she may be threatening.
  • River Monster: The Epidemiology, Ecology, and Pathobiology of Cholera || Radcliffe Institute Water Lecture Series John Mekalanos discusses the biology of cholera, driven by his investigations on the molecular genetics of the causative bacterial organism. With his many colleagues in Bangladesh, Haiti, and elsewhere, he has provided strong evidence for how this organism emerged as a human pathogen and has recently become more pathogenic, as well as for why epidemics begin and end so abruptly. He applied this knowledge to the construction of genetically stable cholera vaccines that have been successfully tested in the United States and Bangladesh. 00:00 Introduction by Joan Ruderman, Senior advisor to the science program, Academic Ventures at the Radcliffe Institute and Marion V. Nelson Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School 01:54 "River Monster: The Epidemiology, Ecology, and Pathobiology of Cholera" by John Mekalanos, the Adele H. Lehman Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics and the head of the Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School
  • The Vitamin D Debate Revisited On February 3, 2012 the Markin Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP) in Health & Wellness once again kicked off its annual Markin Lecture Series. In light of the huge success of last year's Vitamin D Debate, and based on the feedback received from the audience and participants, it was decided that a follow-up event was not only necessary but would be welcomed. The format this year was augmented to include a segment allowing each of the panelists the opportunity to present their research and their viewpoints on this topic. These presentations were followed with a lively debate between the panelists as to the merits of various dosages of vitamin D. As always, one of the most important and popular components of the event was the audience question and answer (Q & A) period following the debate. This session proved to be an excellent platform for the audience to elicit real-life health implications regarding the intake of vitamin D and to further explore the researchers' opinions and expertise in this area. Dr. Stuart Wilkinson (Clinical Director -- Pure North S'Energy Foundation), Dr. Glenville Jones (Craine Professor -- Department of Biochemistry, Queen's University), Dr. Reinhold Vieth (Professor -- Department of Nutritional Sciences and Department of Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology, University of Toronto) and Dr. David A. Hanley (Professor -- Departments of Medicine, Community Health Sciences and Oncology, University of Calgary) represented leading researchers ...
  • Prospects for Vitamin D Nutrition (2 of 5) Reinhold Vieth PhD - Vitamin D Lecture 2005 Professor Departments of Nutritional Sciences, Laboratory Medicine, and Pathobiology University of Toronto Director, Bone and Mineral Laboratory Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Mount Sinai Hospital
  • Janice Clements on the discovery of minocycline for treating HIV-related cognitive disorders Janice Clements of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology discusses her research
  • What is Evolution? Podcasts of Dr. Zachary Moore discussing particular topics within Evolutionary Biology. In this episode Dr. Moore discusses the what the principle mechanisms and processes which Evolution uses and how these are testable. Education • 2005. Doctor of Philosophy in Pathobiology and Molecular Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Ohio • 2001. Bachelor of Science in Biology, University of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • What is Junk DNA? Podcasts of Dr. Zachary Moore discussing particular topics within Evolutionary Biology. Education: • 2005. Doctor of Philosophy in Pathobiology and Molecular Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Ohio • 2001. Bachelor of Science in Biology, University of Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Dan Culver Sarcoidosis Video Dr. Dan Culver is a Staff Physician at the Respiratory Institute and a member of the Department of Pathobiology at the renowned Cleveland Clinic. In addition to his active clinical practice, he has made significant research contributions in the field of sarcoidosis and is the recipient of a research award from the Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research.
  • Food Safety Audits--One Element in a Food Safety Program with Dr. Douglas Powell Food Safety Audits: One Element in a Food Safety Program with Dr. Douglas Powell, Professor, Food Safety, Dept. Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, Kansas State University. Click: Duration: 24 minutes, 21 seconds. Doug Powell, food scientist and creator of an online repository of food-safety related information, joined K-State as an associate professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine's department of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology in May 2006. He was promoted to full professor in 2011. Powell is among a collection of individuals who passionately care about reducing the burden of food-borne illness and who seek innovative ways to compel everyone in the farm-to-fork food safety system -- individual producers, retail employees and consumers, among others -- to acknowledge and adopt best practices to reduce the risk of food-borne illness. He also teaches courses in food safety risk ***ysis, policy, communications and culture. Under Powell's supervision, researchers and students conduct research, provide commentary, policy evaluation and public information on a range of food-safety issues, such as the safety of fresh fruits and vegetables, restaurant inspection disclosures systems and human behavior. The information is available at online repositories like , a forum for musing about current food safety issues where he has written more than 5000 entries since 2006. Powell also conducts research in food-safety risk ***ysis, especially ...
  • Prospects for Vitamin D Nutrition (1 of 5) Reinhold Vieth PhD - Vitamin D Lecture 2005 Professor Departments of Nutritional Sciences, Laboratory Medicine, and Pathobiology University of Toronto Director, Bone and Mineral Laboratory Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Mount Sinai Hospital
  • Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 17th Edition Introducing the most dramatically revised edition of Harrison's ever! Now with NEW bonus DVD with 37 chapters and more than 500 brand new images and video clips! *MORE THAN TRUSTED, BEYOND ESSENTIAL . . .* The #1 selling medical textbook worldwide, Harrison's has defined internal medicine for millions of clinicians and students. The new Seven***th Edition retains Harrison's acclaimed balance of pathobiology, cardinal signs and manifestations of disease, and best approaches to patient management, yet has been massively updated to give you an innovative array of bold new features and content. If ever there was one must-have resource for clinicians and students - this is it! *UNMATCHED EXPERTISE AT YOUR FINGERTIPS* As an unprecedented amount of medical information bombards you and your patients, where do you go to sort it out and make sense of it all? When your patients request clarification on something they've "printed off" where do you turn for expert explanations? The same trusted resource physicians and students have turned to for over fifty years: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. Now more than ever, trust Harrison's to filter and clarify the exploding knowledge base, to highlight the breakthroughs, and to deliver a clear, balanced distillation of the best and most current information on which to base clinical decisions. *THE MOST EXCITING AND EXTENSIVELY REVISED EDITION EVER!* Here are just a few of the reasons why the new 17th Edition of Harrison's is the ...
  • Genomic Pathology, UC Davis Extension UC Davis Extension and the Center for Genomic Pathology specialize in training programs in comparative pathology. We offer online e-learning courses in Comparative Pathology with an emphasis on mouse pathobiology. The online courses are intended for graduate students, research scientists, fellows and pathologists who are seeking training in mouse pathology with an emphasis on genetically engineered models. The courses and the modules are ideal for laboratory staff career development. Two of the offered e-learning courses received the UPCEA Outstanding Distance Learning Award: Tier IA (2010) and Tier IB (2011). Tier 2 is offered to advanced students and principle investigators with organ-specific or special interests. Short course learning modules are available for needs in CE, CME and Career Development. For additional information, visit extension.ucdavis.edu and .
  • How to Make Embryonic Stem Cells without Embryos FEATURED SPEAKER: R. Michael Roberts, Ph.D., Curators' Professor of Animal Science, Biochemistry, and Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Missouri -- Columbia, Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center Embryonic stem cells (ES cells) are pluripotent, that is they have the potential to develop into more than one type of mature cell, and can theoretically give rise to all the tissue of the body. They have enormous therapeutic potential as agents to replace worn out or damaged tissues, but the safety of such cells and the likelihood that they will be rejected as "foreign" raise questions about their eventual utility. Recently, pluripotent cells very similar to ES cells have been obtained by "re-programming" ordinary skin cells, raising the possibility that the graft cells can be matched to the patient. Nevertheless, safety of the technology is still a major concern, as the cells may become cancerous after transfer. In Dr. Michael Roberts' laboratory at the University of Missouri -- Columbia, they are deriving such induced pluripotent stem cells from pig, with the view to testing the safety and efficacy of transplants in a large mammal whose anatomy, physiology, and immune system resemble those of the human. It's a fascinating look at science on the frontiers of biochemistry.
  • Tissue Fibrosis — Killer Number One in the Western World - Part 2 Basic Research Demystifying Medicine Seminar Series Date: Monday, March 26, 2012 Location: McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamitlon, Ontario, Canada Speakers: Dr. Martin Kolb, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine Dr. Jack Gauldie, University Professor, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine Description: This seminar includes a clinical presentation with patient interview followed by a research presentation. Outline the general concept of healing, scar formation and fibrosis. Understand the clinical presentation of debilitating lung fibrosis and how it worsens over time. Review the pathobiology underlying lung fibrosis. Understand how these pathogenetic concepts are translated into drug development.
  • Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy Dr. Joseph R. Berger, chair of the Department of Neurology at the University of Kentucky, studies neurological disorders such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. PML, a rare viral disease, can affect those individuals with compromised immune systems. Dr. Berger provides an overview of pathobiology, clinical manifestations and immunological perturbations.
  • Genetically engineered and conventional sweet corn -- Sept. 2000 Back in 2000, Farmer Jeff Wilson and I thought we'd try and figure out if the consuming public wanted genetically engineered crops or not. As Jeff would say, if people aren't going to buy it, why would I grow it? I recently discovered some of that old video. This was way before youtube, but the idea was, for those who couldn't visit the farm, we would bring the farm to them. The original press release can be found at www.foodsafety.ksu.edu We'll be releasing a bunch of Farmer Jeff videos on youtube over the next couple of months, to provide some insights into the food production trade-offs that farmers face every day. Dr. Douglas Powell associate professor scientific director International Food Safety Network dept. diagnostic medicine/pathobiology Kansas State University
  • How Bird Wings Work (Compared to Airplane Wings) - *** Every Day 62 To learn more click here -- bit.ly -- To take a DEEP DIVE into how wings work! Click here to tweet DeepDive2 bit.ly I hope you never look at a bird in flight the same way again. I know I won't! Artist Info: Sarah Xu, a student at the Vancouver Film School made the awesome introduction Drawing. captainpillow.blogspot.ca Gordon, the guy in charge of "Scary Parrot Monsters" at the end of the video wrote this song. It's called "Black Rhino"... and is available for download online: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ How to get there yourself!: I coordinated the travel with Rainforest Expeditions Tell them Destin sent you. You can checkout what they do on their Facebook page: /Rainforest.Expeditions They ran me up and down the river in a boat, gave me lenses, a clean bed, awesome food etc. It was pretty amazing! See the research project's website here: The project is led by Dr. Don Brightsmith Schubot Exotic Bird Health Center Department of Veterinary Pathobiology College of Veterinary Medicine Jeff Cremer was my hook-up for all things photography once I got on site. He's very good at technical photography and is more than capable of handling anything you can throw at him. Check out his chops and tell him Destin sent you: bit.ly ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ *** EVERY DAY - DEEP DIVE #2 How Bird Wings Work - *** Every Day bit.ly How Wings Work -- A reference for creature props bit.ly How do ...