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opercular

Examples

Images

  • Fig 35 Katie Stammler Teaching Assistant encouraging Erik Szkokan as he reviews his heart beat opercular beat data Fig 36 Jackie Ziegler is amazed at the energy exerted by the salmonid embryos
  • Left Opercular Series Medial View
  • the presence of an opercular spine is unique to this species and unknown in other catfish The species is also a relative small Syonodontid coming in at between four and five centimeters Well I think it s a beautiful fish There is more on this species here and
  • Dana McDermott records the opercular counts and times the intervals while Rhea Moggach observes the opercular movements of a salmonid embryo under the dissecting scope Fig 2 Jordan Matley and Priscilla Lai form a good investigative team one member taking the observations the other monitoring time and recording observations
  • ws opercular series 2 jpg
  • Fig 31 Teaching Assistant Kevin Parson Henry Chow counting opercular beats and Amanda Hawkins timing the experimental interval Fig 32 Corrina Barrett and Tanya Hansen with water baths prepared for their environmental study
  • Fig 44 Julie Long observing the opercular beat of a salmonid embryo under the dissecting scope Fig 45 Heather Fotherby adjusting the magnification of her salmonid embryo sample
  • macropodus opercular > 13 Aug 2009 13 17 173k lysimachia nummulari > 13 Aug 2009 13 17 88k lysimachia nummulari > 13 Aug 2009 13 17 118k lysimachia nummulari > 13 Aug 2009 13 17 74k
  • Keep Fishin
  • FIGURE 10 High power shot of the apical region of the nematocyst The opercular Op structure shows clear striations of alternating electron dense and electron lucent material The apical surface of
  • Laboratory Activities 2004 Fig 22 Shani Clarke counting opercular and heart beats
  • Fig 30 Matt George counting opercular beats Dan Yanke counting heart beats and Rémi Masson timing the intervals in this early ontogeny experiment Fig 31 Teaching Assistant Kevin Parson Henry Chow counting opercular beats and Amanda Hawkins timing the experimental interval
  • I have 2 males both have red tails but one has a noticeable red opercular mark The females all have the same opercular mark but grey becoming black when in brood care colouration
  • Laboratory Activities 2005 Fig 8 Crystal Allan and Kellie Shin are really counting opercular beats and heart beats of a salmonid embryo Unfortunately I did not use the right settings on
  • Fig 3 Christina DesRochers at the dissecting scope counting opercular beats and Angela Chow observing and counting salmonid heart beats from the side of the Petri dish Fig 4 Terri Pettis and Rebecca Breuer forming an opercular heart beat count team
  • to become less active so she may observe and count opercular beats Samantha Allen also waits patiently She will be timing the observations and recording results Fig 6 Sonja Hillis and Adrianna Urtubey form an effective research team investigating the response of Arctic charr to environmental factors
  • Fig 2 Jordan Matley and Priscilla Lai form a good investigative team one member taking the observations the other monitoring time and recording observations Fig 3 Sarah Tuziak counts opercular beats Nadia Pittiglio records observations and Nick Kucharczyk monitors time intervals for this study Lab instructor marie Thérèse
  • Fig 2 Roger Thiessen and Stacey Lee Jenkins enjoying their session on early ontogeny Fig 3 Christina DesRochers at the dissecting scope counting opercular beats and Angela Chow observing and counting salmonid heart beats from the side of the Petri dish
  • 034 skeleton of a fish jpg
  • Fig 4 Terri Pettis and Rebecca Breuer forming an opercular heart beat count team Fig 5 Alex Wilson our Teaching Assistant for the Tuesday lab section You can tell he enjoys his work Renée is seen concentrating on her set up
  • Fig 36 Branden Wringe looking up from his work on the microscope Heinrich Bier ready with the next specimen for opercular beat counts Fig 37 Dan Yanke and Rémi Masson preparing for their early ontogeny study
  • At 4 dah breathing opercular movements began Microscopic observation of the rear gut again shows blackish material
  • Fig 40 Alexis Wells is observing the heart beats and Rebecca Dolson the opercular beats of a salmonid embryo Fig 42 Milena Palka is preparing the bath water for the test salmonid David Eickmeyer and Michelle McKinley are also preparing for the trial run
  • Shark hatching Fig 1 Dana McDermott records the opercular counts and times the intervals while Rhea Moggach observes the opercular movements of a salmonid embryo under the dissecting
  • They show the opercular bone and were it is situated on the pike Note the black dots along the line in the picture below this marks each annual winter spring opague zone
  • one of both sides of the lips is opening During the whole cycle opercular movements are restricted to a very small in and outward movement synchronous with the suspensorial movements Fig 9 Graphs showing movements of some elements involved in respiration and feeding of Ancistrus cf triradiatus during two seconds Three respiratory cycles are followed by three
  • Left Opercular Series Lateral View
  • Laboratory Activities 2005 Fig 30 Matt George counting opercular beats Dan Yanke counting heart beats and Rémi Masson timing the intervals in this early ontogeny experiment
  • ws opercular series 6 jpg
  • Copyright Marine Biological Association of the UK Description Close up of the opercular plates of Elminius modestus
  • Left Opercular Series Lateral View
  • Matt Gardner Cicely Alsbury Cosima Ciuhandu performing salmonid opercular and heart beat counts and timing the trials for their investigation Fig 75 Megan Becker Shannon MacPhee and Erika Lacroix watching the larval ecology video The nitrogen cylinder and regulator may be seen in the
  • Fig 2 140 day old gilthead seabream Sparus aurata Folded opercular complex with blunt appearance of the loose edge by scanning electron microscopy SEM
  • lysimachia nummulari > 13 Aug 2009 22 17 118k lysimachia nummulari > 13 Aug 2009 22 17 88k macropodus opercular > 13 Aug 2009 22 17 173k malawi jpg 13 Aug 2009 22 17 18k
  • Fig 1 140 day old gilthead seabream Sparus aurata A severe malformation of opercular complex which is folded into the gill chamber with the exposure of
  • Fig 22 Shani Clarke counting opercular and heart beats Fig 23 Dr Danzmann supervising his fourth year students The set up in front of him consists of high oxygenated water station for the salmonid
  • In that first shot there the mouth seems too big more becoming of a hybrid Plus the tell tale red patch on the opercular flap wasn t visible Another shot of the same fish IMG http i145 photobucket com albums r237 NateTessler13 HybridPumpkinseed3NettleLake5 2 09N jpg This shot makes him look more like a pure bred Pumpkinseed What do you guys think
  • Fig 45 Melissa Chevalier is focussing her attention on counting opercular beats of the salmonid embryo contained in the specimen dish Fig 46 Sadie Ann Jones and Dana Turner counting and timing heart beat counts of the salmonid embryo
  • Pal palatine Pre preopercular Pm premaxilla Opé opercular Ret retroarticular Sim symplectic Sub subopercular Sm supramaxillar Scale bars 5 mm Arco palatocuadrado o suspensorio Está formado por el cuadrado Cu simpléctico Sim ectopterigoides Ect endopterigoides End metapterigoides
  • Fig 28 Nicole Mazouchova with the timer and Scott Colborne counting opercular beats Fig 29 Ange Ross and Julie Hennigar working together on their experiment

Videos

  • Frogfish in Maui 2008 Frogfish in Maui 2008. They are generally small fish, less than 10 centimetres (3.9 in) in length, with large globose heads. They can be distinguished from other anglerfish by the three extended dorsal fin spines on their heads. The first dorsal spine is modified as a fishing lure to attract prey. The lure consists of the illicium (the spine) and the esca (the bait), and may resemble a worm, crustacean, or small fish. Frogfishes do not swim in the conventional way; instead, they "walk" on their pectoral fins or use 'jet propulsion' (forcefully expelling water from the small opercular opening generally behind and below the pectoral fins). They are mostly bottom-dwelling fish, typically living amongst coral, at up to 100 metres (330 ft) depth, where they lie in wait for prey. They are able to change their colour to match the background with high precision, and their camouflage is further aided by numerous warts and filaments on their skin, giving them an appearance similar to rough coral.
  • How to Fillet Fish : Remove Gills from Fish Learn how to properly gut a fish by removing guts and gills in this free online fish cleaning video. Expert: Bruce Marnie Bio: Bruce Marnie was born and raised in Hawaii on the island of Oahu. He is an active and experienced outdoorsman. Filmmaker: James Hartman
  • journal.pcbi.1000381.s008.mp4 Spring-embedded visualization of resting-state functional connectivity data from Fair, Cohen, Power, Dosenbach, Church, Miezin, Schlaggar & Petersen, 2009 PLoS Computational Biology. Proximity of nodes represents their correlations at approximately .1-1Hz during rest. Time represents change from age 7 to age 31. Nodes are color coded according to adult profile (core node colors) and also by anatomical location (node outlines). Black - cingulo-opercular network; Yellow - fronto-parietal network; Red - default network; Blue - cerebellar; Light blue - frontal cortex; Grey - parietal cortex; Green - temporal cortex, Pink - cerebellum, Light pink - thalamus.
  • How to Fillet Fish : Tips for Determining Freshness of a Fish Learn how to determine the freshness of a whole fish before purchasing it in this free online video clip. Expert: Bruce Marnie Bio: Bruce Marnie was born and raised in Hawaii on the island of Oahu. He is an active and experienced outdoorsman. Filmmaker: James Hartman
  • Icthyology Pt.2 Icthyology may be a key to climate change. What we learn about fish is what we learn about ourselves.In this segment a skull prep is shown of the Opercular jaw series, an Otolith is investigated for the age of a fish. Several rare fish are explored from the Cal Academy: Lantern fish, Piranha, Aligator Gar, and the Angler fish. The Tideppool is explored and several Tidepool Sculpins are observed and later released back in to the wild.