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notational

Examples

  • I had heard about Notational Velocity when Merlin Mann posted about it on 43Folders. Notational Velocity does save notes, either in ASCII, RTF, or HTML, but with the latest version, Notational Velocity syncs with Simplenote or. — “Notational Velocity, Simplenote, and Dropbox bring child-like”,
  • NOTATIONAL VELOCITY is an application that stores and retrieves notes. Notational Velocity's window was designed for keyboard input above all else, and thus has no buttons. — “Notational Velocity”,
  • I'd been seeing a lot of gushy notices about Zachary Schneirov's note-taking app, Notational Velocity, and I think I now see why. All Notational Velocity does is record little notes, but it does that in a way that is completely elegant, intuitive, and incrementally searchable. — “You shall know us by our Notational Velocity | 43 Folders”, 43
  • MUNSELL NOTATIONAL LISTINGS: GOLDEN HEAVY BODY ACRYLICS Golden Artist Colors has developed this list according to the Munsell Color System using a Spectrophotometer and visual interpretation. — “Munsell Notational Listings”,
  • The purposes of this study were to develop a notational system to evaluate Notational ***ysis systems are used to gain insights into characteristics of. — “COMPUTER MODELS OF DIFFUSION FLAME STRUCTURE”, contentdm.lib.byu.edu
  • Notational Velocity is one of my favorites apps for the Mac: it's a minimal and focused writing application that enables you to entirely navigate between notes using the keyboard, it integrates with Simplenote and can store its plain text files anywhere on your computer – Dropbox folder included. — “Notational Velocity with Fullscren Mode, Horizontal Layout”,
  • Definition of notational from Webster's New World College Dictionary. Meaning of notational. Pronunciation of notational. Definition of the word notational. Origin of the word notational. — “notational - Definition of notational at ”,
  • [tweetmeme]You might have been waiting for it, but I have been WAITING FOR IT! Notational Velocity, my current favourite writing application for the Mac now seamlessly syncs with Simplenote! What exactly is Notational Velocity all about? In a. — “Notational Velocity now syncs with Simplenote”,
  • After using it for a while, I began to notice a lot of similarities between it and Notational Velocity. In fact, Tyler Hall actually makes it clear that Nottingham was created as a clone of Notational Velocity, out of a desire to improve on the features offered by the app. — “Notational Velocity vs. Nottingham: A Note-Taking Duel | Mac”,
  • This paper presents the Earthscore Notational System as a formal framework for evolving a shared perception of the natural world along the lines posited by Waddington. The Earthscore Notational System grew out of my efforts to use the video medium to interpret nature. — “The Earthscore Notational System”,
  • Notational definition, a system of graphic symbols for a specialized use, other than ordinary writing: See more. — “Notational | Define Notational at ”,
  • Eun borrows $10 million externally for 5 years at LIBOR; agrees to pay 8 ½ % to Resnick for LIBOR fixed for 5 years on a notational principal of $5 million; Resnick borrows $10 million externally at 10%. C) Since the QSD = 0 there is no mutually beneficial swap. D). — “Quizzes”,
  • Definition of notational in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of notational. Pronunciation of notational. Translations of notational. notational synonyms, notational antonyms. Information about notational in the free online English dictionary and. — “notational - definition of notational by the Free Online”,
  • indicators and performance profiling in notational ***ysis – also If we consider the role of a notational ***yst (Fig. 1) in. its general sense in relation to the data that. — “Notational ***ysis – a mathematical perspective. Mike Hughes”, yunus.hacettepe.edu.tr
  • Notational Velocity is a simple but surprisingly powerful notebook application. There are three fields: the title field, a list of notes, and the body field. Type a search string into the title field. The list of notes will be filtered as you type. — “Notational Velocity - 43FoldersWiki”, wiki.43
  • Definition of notational in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. What is notational? Meaning of notational as a legal term. What does notational mean in law?. — “notational legal definition of notational. notational”, legal-
  • notation n. A system of figures or symbols used in a specialized field to represent numbers, quantities, tones, or values: musical notation All of the notational systems listed below are ideographic. — “notation: Definition, Synonyms from ”,
  • Update 2: If you're interested in developing Notational Velocity, read this too. Update 1: In my original post (below) I use MultiMarkdown and Markdown interchangeably when talking about Steve Frank's forked version of Notational Velocity. — “Building a better writing workflow with Notational Velocity”,
  • notational systems, where value is stored as notations in a ledger or computer. 1 Token and Notational Money. As befits its central role in our market economy, money has been the subject of much consideration. — “Token & Notational Money”,
  • Justin Lincoln's notational productions. Thoughts, text, images, sounds, and videos. — “Notational”,
  • Notational ***ysis studies gross movements or movement patterns in team sports, is primarily concerned with strategy and tactics and has a history in dance and music notation. Patterns of play which lead and did not lead to scoring against specific opponents can then be identified. — “Notational ***ysis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,

Videos

  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Петрунино хоро - Petrunino Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances- Айдарово хоро (Джангурица) Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Ситно шопско (селското) хоро Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Малешевско хоро Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • Notational Velocity (free app): demo Visit goo.gl to receive your all free brand new imac!
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Еленино хоро - Elenino Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • Notational Velocity and SimpleNote Two handy little apps for taking notes.
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Сборенка - Sborenka Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Испайче хоро Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Шопска ръченица -Sh. Ratchenitza Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • LSS006 - Notational Velocity and SimpleNote A brief look at Notational Velocity the keyboard based note taking application (or app as I suppose we should call them now) for OS X that has great SimpleNote integration.
  • Notational Security - Dhivehi Khabaru (27 oct 2010) mnbc-1155
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Дунавско хоро Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • Notational Velocity Notational Velocity: Follow me on Twitter: /cirquedupomme ☼
  • Pure Expectations Theory 2: The Notational Framework An introduction to the Pure Expectations Theory through the notational framework
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Ръка хоро Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Арап -Arap horo Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • Notational Velocity Mac App Review *Note Taking App* This app is definitely the best note taking app ever. ~LINKS~ - Download - My Channel - Twitter
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Чичовото хоро - Chichovoto Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • Notational ***ysis Schematic How to create a schematic in notational ***ysis. In this example I have used Soccer, but it would work just as well for any sport.
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Дайчово хоро Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • Mac Madness Monday - Top 3 Apps Panel Thank you for watching! App download links are below - Notational Velocity - Caffeine - Stock Market Eye - Aperture - Capture One Pro 6 - /en/software.aspx FaceTab - SketchBox - www.omz- A Monster Ate My Homework - Alfred - iProcrastinate - http Disk Inventory X - Echofon -
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Пайдушко хоро - Paidushko Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Трите пъти -Trite Pati Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • SCO0228 - Readability, InstaPaper & Notational Velocity Trailer
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Ширто хоро Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Варненско хоро - Varnensko Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Пазарджишка копаница The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Пазарджишка копаница Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Граовско хоро - Graovsko horo Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. Граовско хоро е българско хоро от Шопската етнографска област, името му произлиза от местността Граово, изпълнява се в ритъм 2/4.Oще от Шопска фолклорна област - За пояс (2/4) , Бера (7/8), Кукунеш (2/4) , Петрунино хоро (12/16) A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether ...
  • Sibelius 5: Notational Software Standard Shows At Winter NAMM 2008 If you're one of those fancy-pants musicians who knows how to actually read music [and write it, too], you might want to check out this video on Sibelius 5 to see what's new. For starters, it contains 3 GB of sampled sounds from names like Garritan and its new VST functionality lets you add in other samples or FX. Other new features like Ideas Hub and Panorama View make it so easy to score, you'll feel like Tom Brady*. * Sibelius was unable to comment on whether Tom Brady's use of Sibelius 5 would cause serious metaphysical disruptions like time lapses and wormholes.
  • Open PDFs with Notational Velocity - Quicksilver Blog: twitter
  • Jacob Senleches - Fuions de ci (22/25) (ballade in manneristic style) Jacob Senleches (fl. 1382/1383 - 1395) (also Jacob Senlechos and Jacopinus Selesses) was a Franco-Flemish composer and harpist of the late Middle Ages. He composed in a style commonly known as the ars subtilior. Fuions de ci (ballade in manneristic style) Rogers Covey-Crump, Mark Padmore and Paul Hillier It has been suggested that Jacob Senleches has been born in St. Luc near Evreux, France (U. Günther) or in Senleches (or Sanlesches) in Cambrai, today France (A. Tomasello). In 1382 Senleches seems to have been present at the court of Eleanor of Castile (d. September 1382), possibly in her service. In Fuions de ci he laments Eleanor's death and resolves to seek his fortune either "en Aragon, en France ou en Bretaingne". Afterwards he is found in service of Pedro de Luna, Cardinal of Aragon (later Antipope Benedict XIII, 1394-1423), as a harpist. There is a treasury document assigning payments to one "Jaquemin de Sanleches, juglar de harpe" from the royal household in Navarra dated August 21, 1383. The payment is made so that Jacquemin may return to "his master", Pedro de Luna. A supplication to Benedict XIII in 1395 records Jacob de Selesses asking for the benefice attached to a parish church in the diocese of Cambrai. Despite the small number of transmitted compositions Jacob de Senleches is counted among the central personalities of Ars subtilior. He developed many rhythmic and notational innovations. The texts deal mainly with himself and his career. Ars subtilior ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Добруджански ръченик Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • Notion Music Progression Puts Notation In Motion As a devout Boy Meets World fan, I was mega-excited, albeit perplexed, to hear that Danielle Fishel was coming to Gearwire Studio. After I got her autograph, all I'd need to do is track down the elusive Rider Strong, and I'd have the complete cast's signatures plus an invaluable collector's item. It suddenly became clear to me that I had misheard some things. We were actually visited by Daniel Fisher of Notion Music who showed us the new Progression notational software, complete with realistic samples that playback on the spot.
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Четворно хоро -Chetvorno Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Опас хоро - Opas Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...
  • Using Your Mac for School! In this video, I discuss free applications & applications that come on macs that are useful for school. Think: Notational Velocity: JustNotes: SimpleNote: Free Mac Applications Preview: The Hit List: (not free) Me:
  • Free Mac Applications In this video, I show you 4 FREE mac applications worth downloading. Bean (free word processor) www.bean- Cloud (easy file sharing) ClipMenu (clipboard manager) Notational Velocity (I LOVE IT) Be sure to watch the whole video!! Check out my other video about free mac apps: My Blog: Twitter
  • Notational Velocity (Mac) Notational Velocity is a tiny free application for mac, which is great for creating & storing notes. Link:
  • The MAGIC Of Bulgarian folk dances - Право тракийско хоро Bulgarian folk dances are intimately related to the music of Bulgaria. A distinctive feature of Balkan folk music is the asymmetrical meters, built up around various combinations of 'quick' and 'slow' beats; as for the music, in Western musical notation, this is often described using compound meter notation, where the notational meter accents, ie, the heard beats, can be of different lengths, usually 1, 2, 3, or 4. One should, however, be aware that this is just the use of an incomplete musical notation, as frequently in actual play, the proportions of these beats do not follow any exact rational proportions. For example, the well known tune Eleno Mome (Елено Моме), exists written in 7=2+2+1+2, 13=4+4+2+3, and 12=3+4+2+3 times. Here, the forms 4+4+2+3 and 3+4+2+3 exist both as a musicologist's way to attempt to indicate the tendency of speeding up the last and first beats, as well in formal version, where the musician plays 3 or 4 about equal length notes on the beat. In music band playing, the meter 7=2+2+1+2 seems favored, thus skipping some of the time-bending subtleties. Given this fact, though, some meters are more common or popular; but there is a wide variation of less frequent combinations, as well. There is also disagreement about whether one should use 1/8 or 1/16 as meter denominator, but this is just a notational convenience. In the list below, the denominator follows in part notational practice of the region, and in part the speed of the type of tune, giving ...