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midrashic

Examples

  • These essays on Exodus make extensive use of some of these midrashic collections, notably Midrash Rabbah and Midrash Tanchuma. a significant selection of midrashic interpretations; often, I refer. — “Reading Midrashically- ”,
  • If you want to unlock the spiritual and ethical treasures of Jewish thought If you want to share the insights and brilliance of Midrashic commentators, both classic and contemporary If you want to discover the depth and beauty of the Midras. — “ -- Kleinman Edition Midrash Rabbah: Bereishis”,
  • Thus one can say that "The Midrash on the verse Genesis 1:1 really means that [and some Midrashic interpretation of the verse would go here] Midrashic literature is worthwhile reading not only for its insights. — “Midrash - Wikinfo”,
  • The term commonly designates ancient rabbinical commentaries on the Hebrew Scriptures At first sight, one might think that such farrago as the Midrashic literature could be of interest and value only to a Jew as Jew,. — “CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Midrashim”,
  • Midrash (Hebrew: ×_ ×_ ×"שplural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. The term "midrash" can also refer to a compilation of Midrashic teachings, in the form of legal, exegetical or homiletical. — “Midrash | ”,
  • Definition of word from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary with audio pronunciations, thesaurus, Word of the Day, and word games. capitalized : the midrashic literature written during the first Christian millennium. — “Midrashic - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster”, merriam-
  • Midrashic tradition sometimes presents these opinions as actual dialogs that took place This midrashic collection was redacted into its final form around the third or fourth. — “Midrash - New World Encyclopedia”,
  • Still, there are a number of intriguing historical echoes of (distorted) facts buried within all this Midrashic tapestry about R. Yehoshua bar Yosef the Galilean ("Jeeezuzz") which sometimes oddly float up to the surface often seem to have an old testament "midrashic" or "pesher" parallel. — “Was "Jesus" a "***" & the Church tried to Cover it up”,
  • Definition of Midrashic from Webster's New World College Dictionary. Meaning of Midrashic. Pronunciation of Midrashic. Definition of the word Midrashic. Origin of the word Midrashic. — “Midrashic - Definition of Midrashic at ”,
  • Midrashic activity reached its height in the 2nd century AD with the schools of Ishmael ben Elisha and Akiba ben Joseph. Midrashic exposition of both kinds appears throughout the Talmud. — “Midrash: Definition from ”,
  • In his essay, Fraade challenges the contention that the "pesher" in the Dead Sea Scrolls is a precursor of rabbinic midrashic activity. In determining the intellectual history of certain midrashic passages one cannot ignore Christian texts. — “H-Net Reviews”, h-
  • Both the artist and critic can deploy midrashic techniques in creating art, and understanding the multiple layers of that art—Jewish or otherwise, textual and even visual. Instead, we must turn to the midrashic mode in order to fill in the most pervasive ellipses of our time: how to live in a world. — “Tikkun Magazine - Midrash and Postmodernity”,
  • [edit] Adjective. Midrashic. Of or pertaining to a Midrash or to Midrashim. Retrieved from " /wiki/Midrashic" Category: English adjectives. Personal. — “Midrashic - Wiktionary”,
  • Rules of Drash We have discussed the midrashic rules of exegesis several times in these posts in the past. It is important to realize that these rules are no less rigorous than the rules of pshat exegesis but they are. — “avakesh: Rules of Drash”,
  • Institute for Contemporary Midrash. — “The Institute for Contemporary Midrash”,
  • A term occurring as early as II Chron. xiii. 22, xxiv. 27, though perhaps not in the sense in which 34b) compares this kind of midrashic exposition to a hammer which awakens the slumbering sparks in the rock. — “ - MIDRASH”,
  • Talmudic-midrashic studies; History and Literature of Judaism in Late Antiquity. "The Midrashic Career of the Confession of Judah (Genesis ***viii 26), Part II: The Rabbinic Midrashim. — “Yale > Religious Studies > About the Faculty > Christine Hayes”, yale.edu
  • A Midrashic Hermeneutic. Papers (A.E. Ware) Papers (F.L. Paine) Midrash. From internal evidence in the New Testament it would seem that Jesus and the apostles employed a Midrashic hermeneutic as evidenced in the manner by which the New Testament often uses and explains the old. — “A Midrashic Hermeneutic”,
  • Rather, other midrashic sources may sometimes serve as a key to particularly esoteric discussions. Midrashic literature is worthwhile reading not only for its insights into Judaism and the. — “Midrash - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • The term "midrash" also can refer to a compilation of Midrashic teachings, in the form of legal, exegetical or homiletical commentaries on the Tanakh. Thus one can say that "The Midrash on the verse Genesis 1:1 really means that [and some Midrashic interpretation of the verse would go here]. — “Midrash - Definition”,
  • 2. The term 'Midrash' can refer to a book - a compilation of Midrashic teachings. Thus one can say that "The Midrash on the verse Genesis 1:1 says that [and some Midrashic interpretation of the verse would go here]. — “Question 3.24: What is a Midrash?”,

Videos

  • Come Inside: A Midrash on Genesis 18:1 by Bruce Chalmer Choir, string trio and piano. A midrashic exploration of the verse in which Abraham sits in the door of his tent to offer hospitality to travelers. Performed by the Rossi Festival Singers and the Burlington Jewish Community Choir, directed by Bruce Chalmer, at Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, Vermont, on June 3, 2012.
  • Midrashic Stories #2- "Why was the Torah given to the Jews?" A Midrashic Story about why the Torah was given to the Jewish people. Presented in ASL.
  • Midrashic Stories #4- Daniel and the Lion's Den Midrashic story about Daniel. Presented in ASL.
  • Delaying Tactics 17-13 = part 166 of series Next: 18-1: Playlist 8 Next playlist = 9 List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: The royal ideology of Judah plays an important role in the eschatological vision of Isaiah. Probably written or redacted in the post-exilic era, Isaiah 11 paints a hopeful picture of a shoot growing from the Branch of Jesse: a messianic promise of a Davidic king who will govern with wisdom and insight. Isaiah explains Israel's woes as the result of the failure of the people to believe Yahweh's promises. Little wonder that the people should apparently disbelieve a series of unkept promises. The Bible's Buried Secrets website: including: Who Wrote the Flood Story? Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: Playlist: List of uploads within playlist: berties- This is the second part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods ...
  • Prophets of Doom 15-7 = part 134 of series Next: 15-8: Playlist 7: List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: The monarchs of ancient Israel and Judah surrounded themselves by prophetic guilds that rubber-stamped royal policy. Some of those who are accredited with nay-saying royal decisions were subsequently designated as true prophets. Micaiah, who purportedly prophesied the death of King Ahab in battle, came to be regarded as one of these true prophets in polemics against the prophetic guilds. The Bible's Buried Secrets website: including: Who Wrote the Flood Story? Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is the second part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: ...
  • A New Approach to Jacob's Struggle: A Modern Midrash A modern midrash told by Rabbi Laura Baum of Congregation Beth Adam and , the online Jewish community. Part of the Yom Kippur Evening service, October 8, 2008.
  • Paul & the Hebrew Bible - Large.m4v Paul was not random or unskillful in his use of the Hebrew Bible. His major emphases in his letters are largely based on what the Torah says about Creation and Covenant. Two examples from Romans demonstrate the skill and brilliance of Paul's midrashic use of the scriptures.
  • ERMINE POPE PRINCESS ALL THIS XMAS VERY STRANGE LOTS OF SYNCH Ermine Street was the Saxon name given to the Roman road linking York with London. Of course, pilgrims will also have come from further N than York: from Scotland, Newcastle and other towns, or from shrines such as Lindisfarne or Durham. But many of these will have gone by sea rather than overland to the S coast. So, because York was the major town of the N of England, this page starts there. It is quite appropriate that the Three Kings should have ermine-trimmed cloaks, for the ermine is a symbol rich in meaning and depth. Deep calleth unto deep, as the Psalm says. In this case, the ermine is a symbol with one layer after another of meaning, each one calling to the next with a more profound sense. No reason for this event is given in the Scriptures, and most traditional commentators tend to be fairly silent as to its meaning. British-Israelites, unable to accept the possibility that a whole chapter of Biblical text might not have a divinely inspired purpose, embark on what must be the best and most interesting example of midrashic interpretation in their entire hermenutical tradition. They accept the Biblical account through the end of Genesis, simply adding a whole extra story before Exodus 1:8 by drawing from ancient histories, various chronicles, and the legends and myths of Homer and Geoffrey of Monmouth.
  • Midrash and the Art of Writing: A Campus Visit by Avi Steinberg On April 12, 2012, Avi Steinberg discussed how the Jewish midrashic mode of interpretation through radical re-tellings of old stories is a useful approach to modern writers, allowing them to conceive of their world in fresh ways, while also connecting to literary traditions. Born in Jerusalem and raised in Cleveland and Boston, Steinberg's experience as a librarian in a tough Boston prison provided the material for his memoir Running the Books: The Adventures of an Accidental Prison Librarian. His work has been published in the New York Times Magazine, Boston Globe, New York Review of Books, Salon, Paris Review, Daily Beast, and others. His visit was co-sponsored by the Crain-Maling Center of Jewish Culture.
  • Midrashic Stories #3 -Why the Temple was built on Mt. Moriah Jewish stories presented in ASL.
  • Lamentations 20 1 = part 194 of series Next: 20-2: Previous playlist = 9 New playlist = 10 List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: The Book of Lamentations addresses the anguish that resulted from the Babylonian destruction of Jerusalem. Lamentations is a series of acrostic poems. Tradition attributes the book to Jeremiah, but the bible makes no such claim. The Bibles Buried Secrets website: including: Who Wrote the Flood Story? Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: ...
  • Yes Men, No Men 15-6 = part 133 of series Next: 15-7: Playlist 7: List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: The monarchs of ancient Israel and Judah surrounded themselves by prophetic guilds that rubber-stamped royal policy. Some of those who are accredited with nay-saying royal decisions were subsequently designated as true prophets. The Bible's Buried Secrets website: including: Who Wrote the Flood Story? Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is the second part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA ...
  • What makes it so GREAT? Tzav: What Makes it So Great? This week's parshah (Torah portion) is almost always read on the Shabbat preceding Passover. Traditionally, this Shabbat is called "Shabbat HaGadol-the Great Shabbat." What is so great about it? A Midrashic story of a miraculous civil war waged by firstborn Egyptians becomes the focal point of the halachic explanation, qualifying this Shabbat as "great."
  • Early Biblical History [mirror] LINKS Original, and "illustrated" Yale course: The ancient Middle East up to Judah's survival after the Northern Kingdom fell to the Babylonians in 586 BCE. This is the opening of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagram illustrating the timeline for books of the HB/OT: Related Playlists Archaeology and the Bible Lost Gospels Who Wrote the Bible? Yale University course on the New Testament The Story of God Creative Commons BY-NC-SA original video:
  • Priestly Materials 9-1 = part 51 of series Next: 9-2: Playlist 4: List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: The Documentary Hypothesis is a response to the multi-author nature of the Pentateuch. Biblical scholars attribute much of the writings in Numbers and Leviticus -- and to a lesser extent in Genesis and Exodus -- to the Priestly school. The P materials are further subdivided into the Holiness code (H) and the remainder of priestly material (non-H, or "p"). The Bibles Buried Secrets website: including: Moses and the Exodus Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is part of a series illustrating a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: ...
  • Dr. Avivah Zornberg Black Sun: Moses and Job Black Sun: Moses and Job After the failure of the Spies' mission, the Israelites undergo yet another massacre as they attempt to enter the Land. Midrashic sources link these narratives with the story of Job.
  • Under Siege 17-6 = part 159 of series Next: 17- playlist 8 List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: Isaiah was a prophet in the southern kingdom (Judah) during the Assyrian crisis. He counselled King Ahaz during the siege of 734 and his son, Hezekiah, during the siege of 701 BCE. The Bible's Buried Secrets website: including: Who Wrote the Flood Story? Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is the second part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: The audio for the lecture series is available ...
  • From Exile to Judaism 19 8 = part 187 of series Next: 19-9: playlist 9 List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: Ezekiel was a prophet of the Babylonian exile. He was a priest who was exiled during the first deportation in 597 BCE, and his prophecies reflect both his background and his response to this experience. After hearing of the fall of Jerusalem (587-586 BCE) Ezekiel shifted from dire predictions to metaphorical visions intended to engender hope of restoration. One of these visions employs the metaphor of re-fleshed bones to depict the restoration. Predictably, Christians have misinterpreted this vision to suit their beliefs. Disconnected from Temple-based Yahwist cultic practices, Jews in the diaspora developed new religious practices -- Judaism. The Bibles Buried Secrets website: including: Who Wrote the Flood Story? Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic ...
  • Midrashic Story #1- Abraham and the Broken Idols A Midrashic Story about Abraham when he was young. Presented in ASL.
  • The Apocryphal Book of Susanna and the Hebrew Canon (1/4) Full Lecture: Prof. Leiman's Brooklyn College Faculty Detail page: www.brooklyn.cuny.edu "The Canonization of Hebrew Scripture: The Talmudic and Midrashic Evidence", Sid Z. Leiman:
  • Moral Impurity 9-7 = part 57 of series Next: 9-8: Playlist 4: List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: According to Jonathan Klawans, the priests of ancient Israel regarded impurity as arising in one of two sources: ritual impurity and moral impurity. Leviticus 18 and Leviticus 20 spell out three main sources of moral impurity: idolatry, homicide and ***ual transgressions. The Bibles Buried Secrets website: including: Moses and the Exodus Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is part of a series illustrating a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: www.jewishvirtuallibrary ...
  • Tehillim 77 Eva Bogomolny Singer/Songwriter ISRAEL This psalm explains the purpose of Israel's long and arduous sojourn in exile. While settled peacefully on its native soil, the contented nation lapsed into a spiritual slumber and neglected its Divine mission, The latent moral and spiritual energy of the Chosen People remained dormant deep within the Jewish heart. The awesome challenges of exile activated this powerful resources. The searing pain of incessant persecution aroused the Jewish soul. The heart of Israel soared heavenward and the voice of the anguished people cried out fervently to the Almighty. The psalmist searched through the chronicles of ancient Jewish history to demonstrate that God saved Israel even in their bleakest moments. Since the Almighty wrought miracles of salvation in the past, why does He not perform miracles in the present exile? Certainly, He remains omnipotent. However, it is God's wish to wring every last tear from our eyes, to squeeze every last cry of repentance from our hearts, so that we might be thoroughly worthy of the final, total redemption. May it come speedily in our times! (The ArtScroll Tanach Series Tehillim Psalms/A new translation with a commentary anthologized from talmudic, midrashic and rabbinic sources) ENGLISH TRANSLATION For the Conductor, on Yedusun by Assaf, a song. My voice is raised to God and I cry aloud, My voice is raised to God and He gives ear to me. On the day of my distress, my Lord I sought, My wound oozes through the ...
  • The Travelling Tent Show 9-2 = part 52 of series Next: 9-3: Playlist 4: List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: The ancient Israelites were semi-nomadic, so their shrines were designed for mobility. Early tabernacles were tent-like structures, surrounded by a courtyard that was enclosed by a curtained screen. Only priests were permitted to enter the shrine area, and the deeper shrine -- the holy of holies -- was entered only on the Day of Atonement. The Bibles Buried Secrets website: including: Moses and the Exodus Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is part of a series illustrating a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: hodos ...
  • "Mystical Immersion, Solution To Negativity, Yahweh The Warrior, Love" Beshalach 1 Corinthians 8-10 Go to to connect with us, get this message in mp3, and support our work making disciples for Yeshua and teaching God's word, the Bible. Teaching on Exodus 10-13 and 1 Corinthians 4-7 from a Messianic Jewish Perspective. Moshe the typical male and the real reason for forty years in wilderness. Shabbat as act of faith in provision of God. Escape through Yam Suf picture of salvation and mystical immersion in Mashiach. Salvation as experience. Spiritual wilderness and the house church movement. Ten songs in midrash, siddur, and book of Revelation. Tradition on demise of Ephraim after jumping the gun. Core bitterness and expressions thereof including unforgiveness, anger, rage, negativity. Humanistic physical perspective versus God-oriented spiritual perspective. Cross sweetens cup of bitterness. Torah and emunah in Hebrew. Silence as spiritual warfare. Yahweh as warrior. Conditional promise of healing. Danger of becoming a knowledge-based instead of love-based movement. Challenge to Ephraim. Evaluation of becoming a Jew. Offenses. Special knowing. Core message of Shema flies in face of extreme sacred name ideology such as Jesus being related to Zeus in Greek. Epiphanius and Eusibius on what happened to the family of Yeshua's apostles, where did they go. The avot of Jews and Gentiles. Torah as example. Midrashic versus literal contextual hermeneutic. All things for the gospel and glory of God.
  • Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz: Healing: Natural Selection vs. Human Rabbi Steinsaltz asks whether we should just allow nature to take its place and select out the strongest from society or we should treat medical illnesses through human intervention. Though the Bible and Talmud seem to indicate that medical treatment is permissible, the Rabbi cites several biblical and midrashic sources that suggest that medical treatment may lead the ill to neglect to seek Gd's healing. The Rabbi cites Maimonides' reconciliation of some of these sources.
  • 12. The Deuteronomistic History: Life in the Land (Joshua and Judges) Overview This lecture concludes the study of Deuteronomy and traces the contribution of the Deuteronomistic School: a historiosophy according to which Israel's fortunes are dependent upon and an indicator of her fidelity to the covenant. The books of the Former Prophets are introduced with attention to their historical and geographical context. The book of Joshua's account of Israel's conquest of Canaan is contrasted with scholarly accounts of Israel's emergence in Canaan and formation as a nation state. Resources "Palestine in the Time of Saul." Atlas of the Historical Geography of the Holy Land. Smith, George Adam. London, 1915. Courtesy of the University of Texas Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin www.lib.utexas.edu Assignment Bible: (1) Introduction to Joshua (JSB pp. 462-464), Joshua 1-13, 20, 23-24 (2) Introduction to Judges (JSB pp. 508-510), Judges 1-8, 13-16, 19-21 (3) Introduction to the Prophets (JSB pp. 451-461) (4) "Early Nonrabbinic Interpretation" (JSB pp. 1835-1844) (5) "Midrash and Midrashic Interpretation" (JSB pp. 1863-1876) Selections from "Interpretation, History of" in The Anchor Bible Dictionary (pp. 424-427, 434-436) Optional: Reis, Pamela Tamarkin. "Spoiled Child: A Fresh Look at Jephthah's Daughter." In Reading the Lines: A Fresh Look at the Hebrew Bible Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers, 2002.
  • Codes and Covenants 10-1 = part 62 of series Next: 10-2: Playlist 5: List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: The multi-author nature of the Hebrew Bible, as well as its influence by Ancient Near Eastern legal traditions shows through in Israelite law. The Bibles Buried Secrets website: including: Moses and the Exodus Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is part of a series illustrating a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: Related Playlists Archaeology and the Bible Lost Gospels www ...
  • Do As I Say, Not As I Do 16-1 = part 141 of series Next: 16-2: Previous playlist = 7 New playlist = 8 Main channel: Because of its strategic position astride trade routes and its political and military weakness, the region suffered crises. Royal transgressions provided convenient fodder for prophetic explanations of major crises: Assyrian, Babylonian, exile, and post-exile. Assyrian crisis: N: Amos and Hosea S: Isaiah and Micah Babylonian crisis Nahum; Jeremiah and Habakkuk Babylonian exile Ezekiel Post-exilic restoration Haggai, Zechariah, Joel and Malachi The Bible's Buried Secrets website: including: Who Wrote the Flood Story? Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is the second part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: www ...
  • Bible - Misconceptions [mirror] Mirrored because many Christians -- particularly fundamentalist Christians -- misunderstand the Hebrew Bible. Original, and "illustrated" Yale course: In reality, modern theologies are 3000 years removed from the personal social concerns and intentions of the first -- and subsequent -- writers who invented what became the Old Testament. "The Hebrew Bible is a product of human effort, written, edited, and compiled between roughly 1000 and 160 BCE. It contains stories concerning moral dilemmas, rather than moral lessons. Its characters are fallible rather than saintly, and it is the story of a nation rather than a theological discussion. Because its subject matter is often violent and lewd, it is not suitable for children; indeed, it is very often misunderstood by adults." Early Biblical History Refloating Flood Epics Bible - Social Commentary and Misconceptions Playlist: This is the fourth part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible, and deals with the misconceptions about the Bible and its construction by humans. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate ...
  • Rabbinic Stories ASL#7- Rabbi Judah HaNasi- the Circumcision Jewish history and heritage presented in ASL. This is a story from our Midrashic and Rabbinic stories video.
  • Urim and Thummim 15-5 = part 132 of series Next: 15-6: Playlist 7: List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: Faced with a theological dilemma, the Deuteronomistic redactor revised theology to frame political and military disasters as divine punishment for disobedience. The prophets explained causes of the crises differently. Prophets can be categorized as ecstatic or apostolic. The Deuteronomist historian condoned divination, provided it was performed by priests who consulted urim and tummim (thummim), which might have been colored stones. None of the literary prophets were female, but some women (Miriam, Deborah, Hulda, Noadiah) did prophecy. Prophets were closely associated with monarchs, and the early kings, Saul and David were reputed to prophesy. The Bible's Buried Secrets website: including: Who Wrote the Flood Story? Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is the second part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature ...
  • Does Judaism Endorse Binary (Either/Or) Thinking? Monica suggests midrash is still being generated. Is Anita Diamant's 'The Red Tent' midrash? Or is it midrashic? bloggingtothebank.me
  • Exile, Redemption, and the Tears of Rachel In a lecture at the Beit Bnei Rachel Center, next to Rachel's Tomb in Beit Lechem, Rabbi Shimshon Nadel explores Exile Redemption & the Tears of Rachel and her Children in Midrashic Literature. For more information: Connect on Facebook Connect on Twitter:
  • Cantor Abbe Lyons- Isaiah- Rabbi Arthur Waskow's Midrashic translation Music by Will Fudeman and Cantor Abbe Lyons for Rabbi Arthur Waskow's Midrashic translation of Isaiah 57:14- 58:14. Lyrics (c) Rabbi Arthur Waskow; Music (c) Will Fudeman and Cantor Abbe Lyons. Recorded by Will Russell at Electric Wilburland, Newfield, NY. Video production- Tony Ingraham, Owl Gorge Productions Cantor Abbe Lyons- lead vocals Mahmud Burton- Ney, Oud, Percussion, Guitar David Frumkin- Violin Will Fudeman- Guitar, Mandola, Vocals Jon Hilton- Electric Bass John Simon- Vocals This piece to be included in the upcoming cd Transformative Judaism: From the Ancient Prophets, Words and Music for Today" by Rabbi Arthur Waskow. To support completion of this project, please send donations to the Shalom Center (note: "Prayer cd"), 6711 Lincoln Dr., Philadelphia, PA 19119.
  • Contra JohnLArmstrong episode 10 very brief synopsis of the 3 points I make in this video 1: This technique of "prophetic fabrication" is called "midrash". Matthew and the other evangelists when "fabricating" prophecies are really just interpreting the Old Testament allegorically. This is perfectly in line with pre-70 AD jewish exegesis as Qumranites would commonly use allegorical methods of interpreting the OT and how the OT passages relate to current events. in short, the OT passages, while not necessarily prophetic in nature, present a theme which Jesus is supposed to have fulfilled or so the Evangelists say. When one calls these midrashic techniques as examples of lies on the part of the evangelists, one commits a grave historical anachronism. 2: When Jews of the pre-70 AD era used midrashic techniques, they usually applied them to ACTUAL HISTORICAL EVENTS. There really is no Jewish precedent of fabricating historical events to fulfill old testament passages. Given that Matthew's use of midrash fits perfectly in line with common Jewish exegesis, it's best to assume that the events which matthew is applying OT passages to really did happen 3: The events which matthew allegedly fabricated fulfill the OT passages in a ridiculously awkward fasion. This embarassing detail really weighs against the possibility that Matthew was fabricating events in the life of Jesus to fulfill OT passages, otherwise they would have not have so awkwardly fulfilled these OT passages.
  • Wisdom Lit 101 20 3 = part 196 of series Next: 20-4: playlist 10 List of uploads within playlist: berties- Main channel: The Bible's Wisdom literature resembles that of the Ancient Near East, and comprises three books: Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes. Biblical scholars recognize three categories of Wisdom tradition: clan or family wisdom, court wisdom, and existential reflection. The Bibles Buried Secrets website: including: Who Wrote the Flood Story? Writers of the Bible: Archeological Evidence and Timeline: This is part of a Yale University course on the Hebrew Bible. The full course can be found here: oyc.yale.edu oyc.yale.edu Christine Hayes is Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. A specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies, Hayes offers undergraduate courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and Introduction to Judaism). www.yale.edu Diagrams illustrating the timeline and books of the HB/OT: The audio ...
  • Faith on the Altar: Abraham's Near-Sacrafice of Isaac in Jewish Thought The intensely troubling story of Abraham's near-sacrifice of Isaac has been central in Jewish thought and biblical interpretation. Jewish thinkers in ancient, medieval and modern times have used this story to think about questions like the meaning and purpose of sacrifice, the nature of Divine mercy, and even to call into question God's justice. This lecture will show how midrashic and medieval interpretation made this story a Jewish one, deeply connected to Jewish ritual, practice, history and hope. Dr. Devorah Schoenfeld is Assistant Professor of Theology, Judaism at Loyola University Chicago. She previously taught at St. Mary's College of Maryland, University of California - Davis, and the Conservative Yeshiva in Jerusalem. Her MA is from the Hebrew University and her doctorate is from the Graduate Theological Union. Her book, Isaac on Jewish and Christian Altars, comparing Jewish and Christian interpretations of the near-sacrifice of Isaac, is forthcoming in spring 2012.
  • We live in the Days just as the time of Noah: LDS Mormon Prophets and Leaders warn and prepare us It has been sometime since I have felt inspired to create another video. (To tell you the truth, it has been nice to have a break and focus on family, reading, church and work.) But I have felt strongly the need for this video to be created. Please feel free to pass this on. It can be eventually downloaded for free at /download/davidkat99 Here is a brief background to the video. A friend of mine, Karen Boren, a wonderful author and researcher found the following quotes for me, which prompted me to create this video. There was only one time in history, where men were given in marriage to men, and women given in marriage to women. Want to venture a guess as to when? No, it wasnt in Sodom and Gomorrah, although that was my guess. Homo***uality was rampant there, of course, but according to the Talmud, not homo***ual marriage. What about ancient Greece? Rome? No. Babylon? No again. The one time in history when homo***ual marriage was practiced was during the days of Noah. And according to Satinover, thats what the Babylonian Talmud attributes as the final straw that led to the Flood. "The generation of Noah was condemned to eradication by the flood because they had sunk so low morally, that, according to Midrashic teaching, they wrote our formal marriage contracts for sodomy and buggery--" Leviticus Rabbah 18:13. Quote from "Jewish Bioethics," Dr. Fred Rosner and Rabbi David Bleich, Ktav Publishing House, Israel, December ...
  • Did a Historical Jesus Exist? Article by Jim Walker (part 4) me again, stumbling along through the fourth part of me trying to read this excellent article and falling flat on my face every time I reach a difficult or unfamiliar word. Ah well. The article is very easy to find if you want to read it yourself--just Google its title. The Gospel authors were Jews writing within the midrashic tradition and intended their stories to be read as interpretive narratives, not historical accounts. -Bishop Shelby Spong, Liberating the Gospels Other scholars have concluded that the Bible is the product of a purely human endeavor, that the identity of the authors is forever lost and that their work has been largely obliterated by centuries of translation and editing. -Jeffery L. Sheler, US News & World Report, "Who Wrote the Bible," Dec. 10, 1990, p. 61 Yet today, there are few Biblical scholars-- from liberal skeptics to conservative evangelicals- who believe that Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John actually wrote the Gospels. Nowhere do the writers of the texts identify themselves by name or claim unambiguously to have known or traveled with Jesus. -Jeffery L. Sheler, US News & World Report,"The Four Gospels," Dec. 10, 1990, p. 63 Once written, many experts believe, the Gospels were redacted, or edited, repeatedly as they were copied and circulated among church elders during the last first and early second centuries. -Jeffery L. Sheler, US News & World Report,"The Four Gospels," Dec. 10, 1990, p. 63 Some scholars say so many revisions occurred in the ...
  • Bishop John Spong On Interpreting The Gospels Controversial Bishop John Spong has written another book, "Liberating The Gospels", the sub-title of which is "Reading The Bible With Jewish Eyes". In it, he says that because the Gospels were written by Jews in a midrashic style, the stories should not be taken as literal narratives but rather as portraits to capture the impact of Jesus. (Originally aired February 1997)