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malacologist

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  • My life as a Malacologist.mov A malacologist is a person who studies clams and snails. But what drives this person to become an expert in these enigmatic and fascinating organisms? Join Dr. Rüdiger Bieler in this behind the scenes of The Field Museum's invertebrate collection and enjoy his life story to become a malacologist.
  • Ask an Expert- Intro- Bernard Sietman Bernard Sietman is a Malacologist with the Minnesota DNR. He was first introduced to Freshwater Mussels as a graduate student in an aquatic invertebrates class.
  • Molluscs & Bioluminescence—Reflections from a Scientist André Martel, Ph.D., speaks about bioluminescence and his observations of this glow-in-the-dark phenomenon, made during marine fieldwork. In French with English subtitles. André is a malacologist and expert on mussels at the Canadian Museum of Nature. nature.ca The museum is a partner in Creatures of Light, an exhibition about bioluminescence that opens March 31, 2012, at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. The show will appear at the Canadian Museum of Nature in 2014.
  • Ask an Expert- Intro- Mike Davis Mike Davis is a Malacologist for the Minnesota DNR. In 1986, he graduated from Winona State College eigh*** years after getting done with college and took a job with the DNR as a fisheries creel clerk. Mike focuses primary on the Mississippi River drainage and played a major role in the plan to revive the endangered Higgins Eye mussel. Over the years Mike has presented his research all across Minnesota, helped start a citizen mussel survey program for Rivers Council of Minnesota, and connected the public to this important natural resource through hands-on activities like mussel hikes.
  • Studying Freshwater Mussels on the Nottoway River Video by Alexa Welch Edlund/Richmond Times-Dispatch Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries's malacologist Brian Watson talks about studying freshwater mussels grown at Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery and released in the Nottoway River.
  • Melissa Frey: 2010 EOL Rubenstein Fellow 2010 EOL Rubenstein Fellow Marine Invaders of the Northeast Pacific Marine Invasions Laboratory, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
  • Lonesome George...Trip to the Galapagos Islands, June 2010 I visited the Darwin Research station in as one of my itinerary in the trip to the Galapagos Islands in June 2010. I personally saw the remaining species of this tortoise called "Lonesome George." Lonesome George (Spanish: Solitario Jorge) is the last known individual of the Pinta Island tortoise (Chelonoidis nigra abingdoni), which is one of eight to fif*** extant subspecies of Galápagos tortoise, all of which are native to the Galápagos Islands.[1][2] He has been labeled the rarest creature in the world, and he is a potent symbol for conservation efforts in the Galápagos and conservation efforts internationally.[3] It is thought that he was named after a character played by American actor George Gobel. George was first seen on the island of Pinta on 1 December 1971 by Hungarian malacologist József Vágvölgyi. The island's vegetation had been devastated by introduced feral goats, and the indigenous G. n. abingdoni population had been reduced to a single individual. Relocated for his safety to the Charles Darwin Research Station, George was penned with two females of a different subspecies, but although eggs have been produced, none has hatched. George is estimated to be about 100 years of age, and he is in good health.[4] A prolonged effort to exterminate goats introduced to Pinta is now complete, and the vegetation of the island is starting to return to its former state. The presence of mixed race Pinta ancestry tortoises around Wolf Volcano, on neighbouring Isabela ...
  • World s Last Pinta Island Giant Tortoise Dies The director of the Galapagos National Park Service has announced that Lonesome George, the last member of his giant tortoise subspecies, has died. He was around 100 years old. Fausto Llerna, his longtime caretaker at Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island, in Ecuador, found the Pinta Island tortoise dead in his corral yesterday morning. Lonesome George was first discovered on Pinta Island in 1972 by a Hungarian malacologist. At the time George's subspecies was thought to have been extinct. He became a mascot for the Galapagos Islands, which attracts some 180000 visitors each year. Park officials had tried to mate Lonesome George with females of closely related giant tortoise subspecies. It happened once, after he lived with a pair of female tortoises from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island) for 15 years. The eggs, however, were infertile. George had lived with two Espanola tortoises most recently. Lonesome George was estimated to be between 100 to 120 years old. This was relatively young for his species, which can live to around 200 years. With his passing, environmentalists believe that the Pinta Island tortoise subspecies is extinct. Park officials say they will carry out a necropsy to determine the cause of death. Edwin Naula, the director of the park, said that the park service will hold a workshop in July focusing on strategies for restoring tortoise populations, in honor of Lonesome George. For more news and videos visit ➡ ‪‬ Follow us on Twitter ➡ ‪http Add ...
  • Unionidae- Mussels of Swan Creek.wmv A brief site investigation on Swan Creek in Whitehouse Ohio with Jeff Grabarkiewicz Urban Conservationist and malacologist. We noticed the mussel density increase as the substrate in the streambed changed. the full guide is available here:
  • Evidence of Global Warming has been found in Jeju Island, S. Korea Jan. 06, Sunday, 2013 Evidence of Global Warming has been found in Jeju - interviewed with Prof. Ron Roseworthy, a malacologist... — at Gwaki Beach in Jeju Island.
  • Lonesome George The last known individual of the subspecies was a male named Lonesome George who died on June 24, 2012. In his last years, he was known as the rarest creature in the world. George served as a potent symbol for conservation efforts in the Galápagos and internationally. George was first seen on the island of Pinta on December 1, 1971 by Hungarian malacologist József Vágvölgyi. The island's vegetation had been devastated by introduced feral goats, and the indigenous C. n. abingdonii population had been reduced to a single individual. It is thought that he was named after a character played by American actor George Gobel Relocated for his safety to the Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz Island, George was penned with two females of a different subspecies. Although eggs were produced, none hatched. The Pinta tortoise was pronounced functionally extinct as George was in captivity. Over the decades, all attempts at mating Lonesome George had been unsuccessful, possibly due to the lack of females of his own subspecies. This prompted researchers at the Darwin Station to offer a $10000 reward for a suitable mate. On June 24, 2012, at 8:00 am local time, Director of the Galápagos National Park Edwin On June 24, 2012, at 8:00 am local time, Director of the Galápagos National Park Edwin Naula announced that Lonesome George had been found dead by his caretaker of 40 years, Fausto Llerena. Naula suspects that the cause of death was heart failure consistent with the end of the ...