Crossword911.com crossword help

drabness

Examples

Videos

  • "Manic Mumbai / Beautiful Bombay" Fleurisima's photos around Mumbai, India A TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow of a travel blog to Mumbai, India by TravelPod blogger Fleurisima titled "Manic Mumbai / Beautiful Bombay". TravelPod is a company of TripAdvisor™. Fleurisima's travel blog entry: "Mumbai - 28/29th December I know I'm struggling to start this record of my travels to India, as I don't know what I want to make of it - a diary of thoughts about my travels or a travel blog. I feel I have come to India in search of some respite from the repetitive grind of the daily London routine, and funnily enough it's amazing how quickly I have felt myself get that as I arrived in India and into a culture so far removed from that. Mumbai is a city that teems with energy all day and all night. As I write this from my bed on the first night, the unrelenting tooting of rickshaw horns and the hubbub of socialising and commerce continues all around. This city is beautiful, in a romantic, ageing way. Its decrepit facades of flats rise high and are so commonplace that you notice only the colourful strings of washing from their balconies and children playing below. The disarray that pervades every corner of every street and building-front is indescribable - and fills me with an energy that I haven't felt in a very long time and reawakens a need to escape the drabness and frustrations of my life in London. India is under my skin already and the buzz of ubiquitous activity is making me excited about life's opportunities once again. 29th December Mumbai heaved today ...
  • DPRK (North Korea): Pyongyang Street Scene (2 of 6) More drabness from North Korea's capital. This is all smuggled footage. Note everyone is in dark, uniform-like clothing. And remember they only let you see the "best" streets. Cars are only for government elite. And even bikes are restricted, as they want to control individual movement. Most people walk very long distances into the city center for work, or use inefficient and unreliable public transport. June 2007
  • RATATÖSKA - Antrieb RATATÖSKA presents a fresh, danceable and deliberately crossed-over-the-genre-limits-sound from Berlin (Germany). Earthy Reggae and impulsive Offbeats meet catchy Popmelodies, Latin- and Balkansounds. The roots for this unique mix are the german-english-spain language skills of singer Christopher and the interaction between the band and the crowd. It's hard to describe how this sounds. You have to listen and watch them live! Is Berlin audible? -- We think so! RATATÖSKAs music and lyrics let lights and shadows of the big city, secrets and platitude of the Berlin life, warming rays of the spring sun and the winter drabness meet together. RATATÖSKA provides for a phat whole-year soundtrack -- no matter in which city. Videoclip was taken from the EP "Antrieb (2009) Homepage: MySpace
  • orso-matrix-soc-finale1.dv ORSO meets MATRIX - "Sounds Of Cinema" Konzerthaus Freiburg, 16. Mai 2010
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 1 1968 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 11 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • "Concrete, Consumerism & the Great Wall" Suenson_taylors's photos around Beijing, China A TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow of a travel blog to Beijing, China by TravelPod blogger Suenson_taylors titled "Concrete, Consumerism & the Great Wall" Suenson_taylors's travel blog entry: "We land in Beijing (Chinese for North Capital) after a short stop over in Hong Kong. It's cold. Six centigrade, overcast with that cold, wet fog that works its way into the bones. Fortunately, we had anticipated cooler weather and did not need to revert to breaking open the backpacks for sweaters but this weather is too much like being at home. The locals were complaining of the coldest winter for many years with the temperature in the city dropping as low as -17c. I was not sure whether this was to reassure us or to apologise but, apparently, it is usually about 20c at this time of year. Driving from the airport, we were struck at once by the amount of concrete everywhere. Boy there must be millions and millions of tons of it in buildings, roads, flyovers and runways that evolve into concrete apartment blocks, housing and gargantuan government buildings. In the drizzle everything took on a drabness that sank the soul. 'So great a number of houses and people, no man could tell the number...' So said Marco Polo in the 13th century and it still seems true today. Beijing covers an area of 17000 sq km, roughly the size of Belgium, and is home to 16 million people (mas o menos as the Spanish would say). That's about 1 in 100 Chinese people and growing all the time. China has a huge net ...
  • Classical Music Composer Edward Elgar - Classical Music Pomp and Circumstance Marches http Classical Music Composer: Edward Elgar Pomp and Circumstance Marches The "Pomp and Circumstance Marches" (full title "Pomp and Circumstance Military Marches"), Op. 39 are a series of marches for orchestra composed by Sir Edward Elgar. About the music commonly known as "Pomp and Circumstance" in the United States, see March No. 1 below. The title The title is taken from Act III, Scene iii of Shakespeare's Othello: Farewell the neighing steed and the shrill trump, The spirit-stirring drum, th'ear-piercing fife, The royal banner, and all quality, Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war!" But also, on the score of the first march, Elgar set as a motto for the whole set of marches a verse from Lord de Tabley's poem The March of Glory which begins Like a proud music that draws men on to die Madly upon the spears in martial ecstasy, A measure that sets heaven in all their veins And iron in their hands. I hear the Nation march Beneath her ensign as an eagle's wing; O'er shield and sheeted targe The banners of my faith most gaily swing; Moving to victory with solemn noise, With worship and with conquest, and the voice of myriads proclaiming the "shows of things": the naïve assumption that the splendid show of military pageantry "Pomp" has no connection with the drabness and terror —"Circumstance"— of actual warfare. The first four marches were all written before the events of World War I shattered that belief, and the styles wars were ...
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 4 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 9 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • King Sepia AKA Drabness Video When there are ages between videos, these desperate faux-artsy montages emerge. What they hold for the future? Well that's to be continued.... may include random ending humor.
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 7 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • England vs France Live Stream live, recorded or highlights Friendly | 17 November 2010 bit.ly England vs France Live Stream live, recorded or highlights Friendly | 17 November 2010 Fabio Capello's experimental England brushed aside by resurgent France Defeat in a friendly should not matter very much, but England will flinch at the familiarity of their inferiority. Although Peter Crouch, on as a substitute, scored with his first touch of the ball as he volleyed home a corner in the 86th minute, the goal will not have distracted anyone from the drabness of the defeated side. The crowd, again astonishingly large for a small occasion, booed at the close, yet only in a half-hearted way, as if it were a contractual obligation. Are you tired of fighting with the missus for control of the television? Are you paying a bomb for terrestrial and satellite television? Do you want to watch live football from the comfort of your computer? If your answer to any of the above questions is yes, then TRUEONLINETV is the panacea to all your problems. The link above leads you to the # 1 website for HD and economical football internet streaming.
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 10 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • Bouroullec Worknest.mp4 A Film by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec of their chair Worknest for Vitra. Between the design and the assortment of combinable colours, Worknest banishes all notions of drabness, rendering the workstation comfortable and fresh for the people who work in it.
  • CATHEDRAL - Commiserating the celebration Our pleasures be joyless doleful experiences We seek not life's beauty but cherish its funeral aspects We seek the misfortunes rich in their non entity Rejoice in celebrating less severe tragedies In the toil to exist we excrete individuality Whilst captivating internment in cloned identity Real is the oration of stone possessed emotion I yearn isolation from this realisation Reject the elation of blissful tranquility Obsessions they lay with the bleak and sinister A wealth of treasures be ours to take possession Still we break bones and gruel to savour simulations Disciples of the drabness devotees of worthlessness Consent to endure the anguish and form only ashes Real is the oration of stone possessed emotion I yearn isolation from this realisation Let me wander through buildings immense in their desolation Away from catastrophe here with gargoyles as my friends
  • 7 Hours Short Film following two directionless youngsters from Santiago, Chile as they head to the Atacama desert to escape the drabness of their city life.
  • Cathedral - Commiserating the Celebration Track 1 from Cathedral's debut album, Forest of Equilibrium. Lyrics: Our pleasures be joyless doleful experiences. We seek not life's beauty but cherish its funeral aspects. We crave the (mis)fortunes rich in their non entity rejoice in celebrating less severe tragedies. In the toil to exist we excrete individuality whilst captivating internment in cloned identity. Real is The oration of stone possessed emotion. I yearn isolation from this realisation. Reject the elation of blissful tranquility, obsessions they lay with the bleak and sinister. A wealth of treasures be ours to take possession yet we break bones and gruel to savour simulations. Disciples of the drabness devotees of worthlessness consent to endure the anguish and form only ashes. Real is the oration (etc). Oh yeagh let me go. Let me wander through buildings immense in their desolation. At peace from your catastrophe here with gargoyles as my friends.
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 5 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 3 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • The Lost Thing Trailer In a world of rivets and drabness, a boy befriends a fantastical red creature that appears to be totally lost: based on the writer-director Tan's prize-winning children's book. Directed by Shaun Tan. This film is part of the Sydney Film Festival. June 2-14 2010. .au
  • Nikos Deja Vu - CITY - Am Fenster (Thessaloniki 1988 Live) Nikos Deja Vu - CITY - Am Fenster (Thessaloniki 1988 Live) City is a German rock band, formed in East Berlin in 1972, best known for the song "Am Fenster" (At The Window or by the window) from its 1978 first album. The band was founded as the City Band Berlin by Fritz Puppel (guitar), Klaus Selmke (drums), Ingo Doering (bass guitar), Klaus Witte (keyboards), Frank Pfeiffer (vocals) and Andreas Pieper (flute). The lineup changed frequently in the band's early years, but stabilized by 1976, with Puppel and Selmke joined by Bulgarian violinist and bassist Georgi Gogow and vocalist-guitarist Toni Krahl. They changed their name to City Rock Band and eventually to simply City. City toured extensively in East Germany, and was given the opportunity to record an album in 1978. The eponymous City showcased the band's guitar-driven rock; several songs are parables, such as "Der King vom Prenzlauer Berg" (The King Of Prenzlauer Berg), about a young man who gets into too many fights; and "Meister aller Klassen" (Masters Of All Classes"), about ***y motorcyclists whose desire for speed ends in tragedy. The band's greatest commercial success, however, was the atypical folk rock-influenced "Am Fenster" (At the Window), which arose from a jam session in the studio when Gogow began to play on his violin. It eventually coalesced into a three-part, 17-minute piece (as well as a four-minute version for radio play). An immediate hit in East Germany, it also became successful in West Germany ...
  • My Channel Intro of Epicness Part 2! (Results Still Varying) Just a little intro to my channel for what you guys should expect from my videos. I'm normally more enthusiastic but I recorded this at about 11:00 at night so forgive the drabness. I promise more exciting videos to come! :D Don't forget to send me a friend request on YouTube and add me on RuneScape. User: Iggy Vannzan
  • Barack Obama's Job Summit.wmv Saul Alinski Wanted to empower people By deceiving them that they would end up with the power but that can't be further from the truth. They use these people to gain power for themselves." When the organizer approaches him part of what begins to be communicated is that through the organization and its power he will get his birth certificate for life, that he will become known, that things will change from the drabness of life where all that changes is the calendar. This same man, in a demonstration at city hall, might find himself confronting the mayor and saying, "Mr. Mayor, we have had it up to here and we are not going to take it anymore." Television cameramen put their microphones in front of him and ask,"What is your name,sir?" "John Smith." Nobody ever asked him his name before. And then,"What do you think about this, Mr. Smith?" Nobody ever asked him what he thought about anything before. Suddenly he's alive! This is part of the adventure, part of what is so importent to people in getting involved in organizational activities and what the organizer has to communicate to him. Not that every member will be giving his name on tv.-that's a bonus- but for once, because he is working together with a group, what he works for will mean something." Rules for Radicals by Saul Alinski. Fox News, MSNBC, Glenn Beck, Sean Hannity, Saul Alinski
  • Bayamon, Puerto Rico, New Year's Eve, 2008 Ah, New Year's Eve in Puerto Rico! Such a difference from the drabness of celebrating New Year's in America. In PR, one can relax with family and friends and watch the fireworks being lit off (and we have an AWESOME view of the island where we were staying!) and can occasionally hear people revving their engines as well. And in years past, some people even fired guns in the air, though I suspect not as much anymore. And they just go on and on, LONG after midnight. Very exciting. No winter coats necessary... ;)
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 2 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • My Channel Intro!! Of Epicness! (Results May Vary) Just a little intro to my channel for what you guys should expect from my videos. I'm normally more enthusiastic but I recorded this at about 11:00 at night so forgive the drabness. I promise more exciting videos to come! :D Don't forget to send me a friend request on YouTube and add me on RuneScape. User: Iggy Vannzan
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 6 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • B//BRTHDAY//PPARTY PART 8 Harold Pinter's first full-length stage play, The Birthday Party, was 10 years old when William (The Exorcist) Friedkin directed it for the cinema in 1968. In some ways, it was already a period-piece by then, Pinter's use of a combination of silence and excruciatingly b*** dialogue to generate precipitous dramatic tension having been absorbed by contemporary theatrical mythology long since. Are the sinister McCann and Goldberg real? Or do they exist only in Stan's head? At the end, we're none the wiser. But Friedkin's claustrophobic direction, with the tormented Stan as its focus, has taken us through a master study in understated horror. The handheld camera, so fashionable in modern television drama, has rarely been used to such hypnotic effect. As Stan, Robert Shaw is mesmerising in his descent to animal-like submission. Sydney Tafler's Goldberg and Patrick Magee 's McCann make a truly terrifying double act. Cult television fans will appreciate an early appearance by Helen Fraser (these days best known as a sadistic prison warder in Bad Girls) as the easily seduced neighbour. Now that Friedkin's film is itself over 30 years old, the scent of mothballs ought to be even more pronounced. Its decrepit seaside boarding house setting and the drabness of the peripheral players are redolent of the distinctly non-swinging side of the 1960s in which it was made. But more than anything, The Birthday Party is about unspecified terror and the sort of inner demons that lurk in all ...
  • Myth: Men Who Cross Dress Are Gay Many people believe that men who are turned on by dressing in women's clothing are gay. But is this just another myth? Dr. June dissects the data and explains the real facts. This video is brought to you by . For more information on love and health, or to read a full transcript of this video, visit
  • Im outing my fav tubers...shhh my fav youtubers....:D Sorry for my drabness...and my toilet going off!!! haha
  • Terrestre - Ejido Del Terror Fourth track on Terrestre's (Fernando Corona/Murcof) Secondary Inspection LP. (Static Discos) One repeated hit in time is annoying. Two is a beat. Add three or four more and you have the design of most minimal dance music out there today. Mexican resident and former Nortec Collective member Fernando Corona returns to his more dance-influenced character, after breaking ground with his unflinching attempt to meld classical samples with electronics as Murcof. On the surface, it is minimal as usual, with half a dozen distinct percussive sounds clicking in perfect machination, Corona engaging the clutch just long enough to add or remove another gear in his automation. But similar to equatorial natives Ricardo Villalobos and Luciano, Corona's cowbell hits and conga paradiddles possess a syncopated funk that renders any additional need for melody or hook obsolete in commanding your attention. But perhaps because he has not yet chosen to reside in Europe, Corona's drum strikes offer a much livelier and more colorful tone than the muted drabness of his otherwise contemporaries. On "Secondary Inspection Theme" he shades his full-frontal conga and cymbal wallop with dark tones reminiscent of Plastikman in their foreboding and endlessness. "Vaqueros del Ayers" borrows some fast chirps from Akufen and "Ultra Tumba" speeds up a dub pulse already familiar to fans of Basic Channel. Like the best in his field, Corona takes the methods of his predecessors and adds his own festive yet still ...
  • "Lima" Lizallen's photos around Lima, Peru A TripAdvisor™ TripWow slideshow of a travel blog to Lima, Peru by TravelPod blogger Lizallen titled "Lima". TravelPod is a company of TripAdvisor™. Lizallen's travel blog entry: "Nothing had prepared us for the drabness of the area surrounding Lima airport. This was the start of the "third world". 25% unemployment in Lima. The place is full of old battered buses which, in turn, are crammed full of people. Houses often had no roofs, some were made of mud, they all looked poor. The overcast sky full of smog apparently stays the same throughout the 5 months of "winter" though it was not at all cold. The beach area was stark and ugly though it got better when we got to Miraflores. Miraflores is one of the better areas full of hotels, shops, tourist police, casinos and eateries with a really nice eatery/shopping complex down on the cliff overlooking the Pacific. After the initial shock, the people were not as scary as the tourist guides led us to believe and everything was very cheap (apart from our hotel!!!) and seemed to be good value. The food was excellent. We tried the national drink "Pisco Sour" - not quite to my taste but son, Mark, liked it - then he is 19. First morning we went to visit the local Bruce Peru school - a charity providing basic education for street children who are not able to go to school - look at their website - they need volunteers and donations. After spending a while there talking to one of the victims of the recent earthquake - a kid called Simon ...