Crossword911.com crossword help

doxastic

Examples

Videos

  • intro to philosophy lecture 19 (1 of 2) evaluating pascal's wager lecture by sean landis
  • Re: Re: Freewill and Lazy Deities... But what about this notion of "instilling beliefs" and it's relation to belief formation? TBS doesn't use the word, but it sounds like this is what he's getting at...or something like it. Beliefs aren't "put" in us. Beliefs aren't "done" to us. That's not what it is for our cognitive faculties to function properly. Beliefs are "had" (properly basic beliefs) or they are "reasoned to" from other beliefs/seemings. See -- a part of a book by Alvin Plantinga where he talks about warrant and the proper function of our cognitive faculties. -- Veritas48's video on warrant and Christian Belief. Here's what I mean by 'seemings': On simple seeing: "If one sees a red apple, then one has a sensation-of-red, ie, is appeared to in a red-type way." (JP Moreland and William Lane Craig from "Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview") On seeming: ...there are cognitive intuitions "...and these divide into doxastic, which are beliefs, and non-doxastic, which are seemings. Both are cognitive in having propositional objects." (Robert Audi giving a lecture at Notre Dame) What I'm getting at is that it is possible that people have knowledge without believing a *proposition*. Of course the knowledge would have to be propositionalizable, but it doesn't have to be a belief in a proposition. But still, even with this revision, TBS's argument can still be made: 1. If God hasn't actualized states of affairs whereby all peoples of all times, by means of their ...
  • 2010 USASA Nationals Boardercross Course This is the course used for the USASA Nationals in snowboard cross. The wide angle lens shrinks the features, but gives an idea of what it looked like.
  • Doxastic Intro New Name - New beats, check it out
  • intro to philosophy lecture 19 (2 of 2) evaluating pascal's wager lecture by sean landis
  • Pascal's Wager Pt.3 addendum: (why can I not comment on my own videos so that everyone sees the comment?) Jackies1979 (17 minutes ago) Show Hide Marked as spam (Reply) (Remove) (Block User) (Spam) but many of the other bloggers suggest that if you don't believe and god exists, you go to hell, so your matrix is wrong.... Jackies1979 (13 minutes ago) Show Hide Marked as spam (Reply) (Remove) (Block User) (Spam) yes, Jackies1979, this is very true, but here I criticize the original version of Pascal's Wager which suggests none other than this matrix (also with giving up (well, at least part of) your life if you believe...)... in the version with hell, I don't know how to argue against it currently Jackies1979 (10 minutes ago) Show Hide Marked as spam (Reply) (Remove) (Block User) (Spam) given that you equate hell with a negative infinity of lives... maybe argue against possibility or depravity of hell which may be question-begging... don't know.... maybe I still want to have hell, if I absolutely want to "sin" on earth, and I can do that neither in hell or heaven, so must do it here :-)).... no idea You are all wrong.... Here I refute the validity of the argument that, because believing in god promises good payoffs, you should (at least: pretend to) believe in God, and I show that the popular counterarguments against Pascal's Wager (as the argument is called) are flawed... There are four parts... ok, I should make my reservations as for the regular counterarguments a bit clearer as I fear they ...
  • Discreet Nation - All The Spots Ft. Francois The Whiz Kidd Discreet Nation, The Wavelength EP FREE DOWNLOAD HERE: OR DOWNLOAD AT
  • Religion & Epistemology: Knowledge, Truth, & Justification This is brief introduction to philosophical epistemology as it concerns religion as a whole. I assert a doxastic problem to religions that possess soteriological exclusivity, such as orthodox Judaism, Christianity and Islam.
  • Doxastic-Fear FEAR by DOXASTIC of DISCREET NATION. video put together by ARCH3VIL (the scenes in this video are copyright lucasfilm ltd, i am not claiming ownership of the material used)
  • Pascal's Wager Pt.1 You are all wrong.... Here I refute the validity of the argument that, because believing in god promises good payoffs, you should (at least: pretend to) believe in God, and I show that the popular counterarguments against Pascal's Wager (as the argument is called) are flawed... There are four parts... ok, I should make my reservations as for the regular counterarguments a bit clearer as I fear they are rather obscurely formulated orally in the vid...: doxastic voluntarism/only an argument for pretending to believe: what if that suffices and God is keen on having hypocritical followers -- this is after all a logical possibility supported also by how god is presented in the Abrahamic religions as cruel, jealous etc... religious hucksterism: again, if god likes that, what would you like to do given you cannot change that? many religions/why not believe instead in Zeus or...: the argument still runs through: for "if God exists" simply put "if *your* god exists (as the only true, rewarding God he's supposed to be in your religion)", then if all alleged Gods are also alleged to reward you with an eternal afterlife, then the argument is still standing in the way it would if there were only one religion apart from disbelief!!! Grant (as you should even as an atheist) that any God's existence has a probability of non-zero and grant ex hypothesi that any God will, if he exists, reward you with an infinite afterlife, then pretending to believe in any God will -- given his cruelty ...
  • "The Shifting Sands of Evidence & Argument" (Why Religious Arguments Fail to Persuade)--Part 1 As anyone who has participated in or even just watched various religious arguments being presented and debated knows, religious arguments tend to be persuasively inert and, usually, are found compelling only by those who already accept the conclusion of such arguments. This two-part video attempts to get at some of the reasons for this. Back in late March 2010, my friend Myintellectualjourny asked me to respond to some questions about, inter alia, things theists and nontheists have in common. I had been thinking a lot and writing a bit about persuasion, particularly (though not exclusively) in the context of religious arguments. Eventually, I came to suspect that I had identified some of the common ground MIJ had asked me to talk about. I'm no longer so sure, but I'm offering this video both as an answer--a long overdue one at that--to MIJ's request AND, more generally, as a basis for discussion about the roles and effectiveness (or ineffectiveness, as the case seems to be) of religious arguments. Links: 1. Jennifer Faust's article "Can Religious Arguments Persuade?" 2. "Belief in God Without Arguments?" video from the AlwaysMuslim channel here on YouTube (quoted in part one): 3. Myintellectualjourny's video "The Peace Talks": 4. Part 2 of this video: 5. Lorne L. Dawson's article "When Prophecy Fails and Faith Persists: A Theoretical Overview" (which provides an excellent account of the role of cognitive ...
  • Pascal's Wager Pt.4 There is news: jonthebaptist666 significantly shortened the argument: by adding the premise that there is an infinite number of possible Gods, my EV calculations become inadequate: then you have (see comments) an EV of 1 life both for believing and for disbelieving, and since the cost for the latter is much lower you should disbelief, that makes it really short... BUT: my criticism still stands: I mean: the many religions objection as not valid, of course many does not exclude infinitely many, but many as such does not suffice: there is a valid objection to the Pascal wager (again without possibility of hell), but this is not the *many*-religions objection but the *infinitely many*-religions objection!! You are all wrong.... Here I refute the validity of the argument that, because believing in god promises good payoffs, you should (at least: pretend to) believe in God, and I show that the popular counterarguments against Pascal's Wager (as the argument is called) are flawed... There are four parts... ok, I should make my reservations as for the regular counterarguments a bit clearer as I fear they are rather obscurely formulated orally in the vid...: doxastic voluntarism/only an argument for pretending to believe: what if that suffices and God is keen on having hypocritical followers -- this is after all a logical possibility supported also by how god is presented in the Abrahamic religions as cruel, jealous etc... religious hucksterism: again, if god likes that, what ...
  • Pascal's Wager Pt.2 You are all wrong.... Here I refute the validity of the argument that, because believing in god promises good payoffs, you should (at least: pretend to) believe in God, and I show that the popular counterarguments against Pascal's Wager (as the argument is called) are flawed... There are four parts... ok, I should make my reservations as for the regular counterarguments a bit clearer as I fear they are rather obscurely formulated orally in the vid...: doxastic voluntarism/only an argument for pretending to believe: what if that suffices and God is keen on having hypocritical followers -- this is after all a logical possibility supported also by how god is presented in the Abrahamic religions as cruel, jealous etc... religious hucksterism: again, if god likes that, what would you like to do given you cannot change that? many religions/why not believe instead in Zeus or...: the argument still runs through: for "if God exists" simply put "if *your* god exists (as the only true, rewarding God he's supposed to be in your religion)", then if all alleged Gods are also alleged to reward you with an eternal afterlife, then the argument is still standing in the way it would if there were only one religion apart from disbelief!!! Grant (as you should even as an atheist) that any God's existence has a probability of non-zero and grant ex hypothesi that any God will, if he exists, reward you with an infinite afterlife, then pretending to believe in any God will -- given his cruelty ...
  • Discreet Nation - The Wavelength Ft. Francois & Artis Discreet Nation, The Wavelength EP FREE DOWNLOAD HERE: OR DOWNLOAD AT